From The Forest
Summer of the Cicada

Summer of the Cicada

June 24, 2021
When Rip Van Winkle awoke from his 20-year sleep in the Catskill Mountains, he found that a lot had changed. His dog was gone, his gun rusted, and New Netherland had been taken over by the English. Although a great fictional story, there is one insect that comes close to meeting Rip's long sleep--the periodical cicada. 
 
On this week's show, CFA's Forest Program Technician--Zane Lawyer--will discuss the periodical cicada that emerges every 17 years, and 2021 is its due date. What has changed for you since its last emergence in 2004? And what will change by its next in 2038? Who knows, but we'll talk about the ins & outs of this unique true bug.
 
Zane was hired full-time in June 2020 as a Forest Program Technician. He assists the Forest Program Manager to develop, coordinate, and implement CFA’s programs and services. Zane also helps in the development and creation of field and written content for CFA programs, events, and newsletters. Zane is an ISA Certified Arborist and received his Bachelor of Science degree in Forest Health with minors in Applied Statistics and Environmental Writing and Philosophy in May of 2016 from SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry.
The Importance of Young Forests with Rowan University’s Dan Duran

The Importance of Young Forests with Rowan University’s Dan Duran

June 17, 2021
"Conservationists and others have led most of us to treasure older forests more than other ecosystems. Open-field habitats and young forests, however, hold significantly more biodiversity than closed-canopy forests. Those younger forests are often under-valued and less protected. Dan will sketch some of the differences in these habitats, give us an overview of the conservation issues, and discuss ways that listeners can get involved in helping to create and maintain early successional forest and 'edge' habitats."
Entomologist/taxonomist/evolutionary ecologist and Assistant Professor at Rowan University.

Dan's interests are in the fields of systematics, taxonomy, and biodiversity conservation. His research is primarily focused on biodiversity exploration and the discovery of 'cryptic species'; species that are distinct evolutionary units, but go undetected due to physical similarity with closely related species. He mostly uses tiger beetles (Cicindelinae) as a study system. Dan is also interested in examining the important roles of insect and plant biodiversity in ecosystem functioning. He has recently begun work on the impacts of industrial hemp growing practices on insect biodiversity. 

What’s Going on with Power Tools, Markets & More with Business Owner Bob Conyea

What’s Going on with Power Tools, Markets & More with Business Owner Bob Conyea

June 3, 2021

Bob Conyea is co-owner of Ashokan Turf & Timber in Ashokan, Ulster County, which puts Bob into contact with all types of chainsaws & forest tools to fix and replace. Since chainsaws don't walk themselves to his shop, Bob also gets to talk to a lot of people who work in the woods where he gains "a pulse" on what's going on out there.

Bob will give us an idea of what people have been facing--who work in the woods--over these last 15 months during COVID-19, especially as it pertains to supply chains, demand, and demographic changes.

Flowers from Summer to Fall with Gary Mead

Flowers from Summer to Fall with Gary Mead

May 27, 2021
Every Third Wednesday of the Month we speak with Gary Mead of Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville NY. Gary has a long career of milling trees in these Catskill Mountains and working with wood to create unique pieces of furniture and art.
This week we will be discussing some of Gary's favorite flowers both in & around the woods. Gary will explain how "the earth laughs with flowers." Should be fun.
Lyme Disease & Invasive Species with UConn’s Tom Worthley

Lyme Disease & Invasive Species with UConn’s Tom Worthley

May 20, 2021
Research conducted by UConn's Tom Worthley indicates that reducing Japanese barberry will also reduce ticks and their associated diseases. We'll discuss with Tom how each relate to one another and what might be done in the forest to mitigate this condition.
Tom Worthley  is an Associate Extension Professor at UCONN Cooperative Extension Service & UCONN Department of Natural Resources and the Environment. He has written a number of scholarly articles and also teaches courses in Forest Ecology and Management and Dendrology. Tom has worked extensively on tracts in the UConn Forest and beyond in both outreach and educational activities.
Sap & Syrup Beyond Maple with Crooked Chimney’s David Moore

Sap & Syrup Beyond Maple with Crooked Chimney’s David Moore

May 13, 2021

Ever wonder about other trees that can be tapped for sap, and made into syrup besides maple? David Moore of Crooked Chimney in Lee, New Hampshire will explain his experiences with birch, sycamore, beech, walnut, and more.

David is also a Doctoral student at the University of New Hampshire and is researching: (1) Environmental conditions  that drive sap flow in deciduous trees during winter dormancy; & the anatomical & physiological features of wood  that are involved in this process. He is also researching (2) How sap can be harvested and made into syrup from trees other than maple.

Will see what he has found.

Ancient Artifacts in the Forest with the Overlook Mt. Center

Ancient Artifacts in the Forest with the Overlook Mt. Center

May 7, 2021
Overlook Mountain Center's--Glenn Kreisberg--will discuss Native American Ceremonial Stone Landscapes (CSL) found in the Catskill Mountains, particularly Overlook Mountain. Examples include dry stacked stone cairns, stone rows, aligned boulders and more. Some of these--it is believed--may also have significant astronomical value for thousands of years. 

Glenn Kreisberg is the Chairperson of the Overlook Mountain Center in Woodstock, NY. He is a licensed outdoor guide for twenty years. He is also a radio frequency engineer, writer and researcher who currently serves as Vice President of the New England Antiquities Research Association ( www.NEARA.org ). He’s researched and published articles and interviews on electromagnetism and the ancients, historic bluestone quarrying in upstate New York and lithic sites and alignments in the northeast U.S., among others. Glenn is also the current editor of the Author of the Month page featured at grahamhancock.com as well as the founder and editor of the alternative science and history web site www.ASHnews.org. He resides in Woodstock N.Y. with his wife and two children. His first book, an edited anthology of essays titled Lost Knowledge of the Ancients, is out now by Bear & Co. Inner Traditions.

OMC, a NYS nonprofit formed in 2013, promotes awareness and understanding of the relationship between Overlook Mountain and the human populations that have encountered it throughout time. OMC creates programs, exhibits and tours to educate, experience and celebrate all aspects of Overlook Mountain and its ecosystems.
The American elm with Gary Mead

The American elm with Gary Mead

April 29, 2021
Every Third Wednesday of the Month we speak with Gary Mead of Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville NY. Gary has a long career of milling trees in these Catskill Mountains and working with wood to create unique pieces of furniture and art.
This week we will be discussing the American elm tree. Many of America's elm trees have been killed off by the Dutch elm disease, but there are a few that persist in the Catskills as great, big trees. Gary will discuss his experiences with this tree--mostly its beautiful woody attributes. 
What’s Eating My Apple–The Growing Impact of Wildlife on Growing Apple

What’s Eating My Apple–The Growing Impact of Wildlife on Growing Apple

April 22, 2021

Peter Jentsch will discuss how to take care and protect your apple trees from pests and diseases, especially as they begin to break dormancy and enter into the growing season.

Peter J. Jentsch is the Station Director, Senior Extension Associate, Research & Extension Entomologist at the Hudson Valley Research Laboratory, (of Cornell University) in Highland, Ulster County. Peter focuses on pome fruit, small fruit, grape and onion. Peter focuses on the efficacy of newly developed pest management tools for invasive insects and native insect pest complex. Peter employs strategies in a cost-effective and environmentally sound approach that provides fruit growers with the knowledge to improve insect pest management strategies.

ABOUT

The Hudson Valley Research Laboratory (HVRL) is an independent 501c3. HVRL provides growers with a non-biased approach to research & problem solving. HVRL is apart of Cornell’s College of Ag. & Life Sciences and has been a partner since 1923. Its focus is mainly on tree fruit research programs; disease & insect pest mgt. with growing support into horticultural practices; small fruit; vegetables; & grains.

Maple Sugaring Report from Marty Giuliano

Maple Sugaring Report from Marty Giuliano

April 22, 2021

Marty Giuliano is a long-time maple producer who owns Marty's Maple Products Farm in West Shokan, Ulster County. The 2021 maple sugaring season just ended and we'll get Marty's perspective on how it went in central Ulster County.

Very Old News in the Catskills with Paul Misko

Very Old News in the Catskills with Paul Misko

April 8, 2021
Guest speaker--Paul Misko--will discuss a variety of historical newsworthy stories from the Catskills. Or in Paul's words, "I'll have a potpourri of pithy newspaper stories from the 1800s and early 1900s." Paul always brings along some interesting facts and stories with a strong sense of humor. We'll see.
Paul Misko grew up hiking around Woodland Valley and the Slide Mountain Wilderness area. When Paul isn't busy traipsing around the woods, he can be found giving various historical talks on Tanneries in the Catskills and Naturalist John Burroughs.
Look Out for the Spotted Lanternfly

Look Out for the Spotted Lanternfly

April 1, 2021

Spotted lanternfly (SLF) (Lycorma delicatola) is an insect from Asia that attacks over 70 plants-- i.e. grapes, fruit trees, hops, tree of heaven, and others. It was first found in 2014 in PA. in 2020, NYS found its first SLF in Staten Island. We'll discuss how to identify this little bugger, its potential impacts, and what you might do to mitigate it.

Powderpost Beetles with Gary Mead

Powderpost Beetles with Gary Mead

March 25, 2021
Every Third Wednesday of the Month we speak with Gary Mead of Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville NY. Gary has a long career of milling trees in these Catskill Mountains and working with wood to create unique pieces of furniture and art.
This week we will be discussing powderpost beetles. Gary has recently come across this little bugger quite a bit. Apparently, these beetles can wreak havoc on finished wood products. We'll cover how to identify powderpost beetles, their biology, and some ways to discourage them from ruining your prized woody possessions. 
Grafting Wild Apple Trees

Grafting Wild Apple Trees

March 25, 2021

On this week's show, we'll be discussing the ins & outs of grafting wild apple trees: (1) Why graft wild apple trees; (2) Grafting overview; (3) Gathering scionwood; (4) Grafting techniques; & (5) Aftercare

Forest Preserve Foreshadow

Forest Preserve Foreshadow

March 12, 2021
Whether you're for, against, or indifferent to NYS's Forest Preserve system in the Catskills & Adirondacks, it certainly has shaped how people perceive environmentalism and natural resources management.
On this week's show, we'll share our perspective on the importance of the Forest Preserve and how it has shaped current and future environmental paradigms.
The Forest Preserve may serve as the ultimate "foreshadow" of both good and bad things to come to our forests. We'll discuss 4 foreshadows that the Forest Preserve--we believe-- has "telegraphed" in natural resources management. (1) The Preservation Movement; (2) The Return of Forests & Fauna; (3) Maturing Forests with Fewer Deer; & (4) Impacts to Forest Regeneration. We'll leave off on how the Forest Preserve may now be foreshadowing a huge paradigm change--once again--in environmentalism today.
Playing with Fire with NJ Forester Bob Williams

Playing with Fire with NJ Forester Bob Williams

March 4, 2021
Raging fires have been in the news quite a bit recently; Are they due to climate change, mismanagement, both, or others? We'll get NJ Forester Bob Williams's perspective. Bob recently wrote an article in Forest Landowner magazine--"Playing with Fire--Years of poor public forest management has created the perfect storm for wildfires. Prescribed burning and other familiar techniques could go a long way to solving the problem."
Bob Williams is the owner and founder of Pine Creek Forestry LLC. Bob graduated with an Associate's degree in forestry in 1972 from Centralia College and a Bachelor's Degree in Forestry from Rutgers University, New Brunswick in 1975.  Bob has 43 years of experience in the field of forestry. His experience includes working for the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, the US Forest Service in Alaska and Washington, and Scott Paper Company as a logging engineer. Since 1985, Bob has worked as a consulting forester in New Jersey working with both private and public landowners to achieve management and stewardship goals for natural resources. In addition to consulting work, Bob has authorized many forestry activities, as well as newsletters put out by various forestry organizations.
Cottonwood with Gary Mead

Cottonwood with Gary Mead

February 25, 2021

Every Third Wednesday of the Month we speak with Gary Mead of Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville NY. Gary has a long career of milling trees in these Catskill Mountains and working with wood to create unique pieces of furniture and art. This week on From the Forest we will be discussing Cottonwood Trees with Gary Mead. Gary will share his experiences cutting, sawing, drying and working with Cottonwood Trees.

Backyard Maple Sugaring with Mike Porter_2021

Backyard Maple Sugaring with Mike Porter_2021

February 25, 2021
Humans can make maple syrup, but we can't make the sap run, and so we must wait for warmer temperatures; The taste is worth the wait for sure. The Catskills include the heart of the sugar maple's range. Our mountains might not be ripe for growing vegetable crops, but our well-drained, rocky soils are just right for the maple tree.
 
Catskill Forest Association's--Board President--Mike Porter will discuss the basics surrounding the production of "backyard" or small-scale maple syrup.

Mike is a retired teacher from Margaretville Central School. He taught Earth Science, Environmental Science, Science Research in the High School, Driver Education and several elementary and junior high courses over his 33-year career. In 1988 he was selected as the New York State Conservation Teacher of the Year by the New York State Board of Soil and Water Districts. A life-long resident of Delaware County, Mike is an avid birder and has studied the changes in the avian community over the years.

As a small woodlot landowner, he has learned to manage his property to better enhance wildlife, timber quality and maple syrup production. Mike has been an active volunteer Fireman for nearly 45 years and was an Executive officer for most of that time. He was a member of the Town of Middletown Zoning Board of Appeals and, later, a Planning Board member and Chair. Besides birding, Mike gardens, makes Maple syrup, cuts his own firewood and does woodworking. Currently, he is harvesting trees from his property and preparing his own lumber via a bandsaw mill on the property.

Quercus Cooperage with Owner John Cox

Quercus Cooperage with Owner John Cox

February 11, 2021

"When John Cox, owner/operator of Quercus Cooperage in High Falls, realized that nobody in New York was making oak barrels to meet the demands of the growing Hudson Valley craft beverage industry, he decided to make a career switch. Drawing from three decades as a cabinet maker and woodworker, Cox spent the next two years teaching himself how to make barrels by painstakingly reverse engineering the vessels."

We'll talk to John about the process from start to finish as well as the cooperage industry's significance both locally and beyond throughout time.

Best Trees for Home, Urban, & City Landscapes in the Northeast with Dr. Donald Leopold

Best Trees for Home, Urban, & City Landscapes in the Northeast with Dr. Donald Leopold

February 5, 2021

On this Wednesday’s show, Dr. Don Leopold from the SUNY’s College of Environmental Science & Forestry will discuss the “Best Trees for Home, Urban & City Landscapes in the Northeast.” Don will go into mostly recommended native species and some non-native choices too.

Dr. Donald J. Leopold earned his Ph.D. in forest ecology from Purdue University in 1984, M.S.F. in forest ecology from University of Kentucky in 1981, and B.S. in ornamental horticulture/nursery management from the University of Kentucky in 1978. He joined the Faculty of Environmental and Forest Biology at the SUNY ESF in 1985. Since 1985 has been teaching the oldest and largest Dendrology (study of trees) course in the US. In 1998 he was promoted to Distinguished Teaching Professor. He was Chair of the Department of Environmental and Forest Biology from 2006 until 2019. He has published over 70 peer-reviewed papers and seven books including the Textbook of DendrologyTrees of New York State, and Wildflowers of the Adirondacks; has over 130 tree videos (each about 2 to 3 minutes long) on You-Tube.

Balsam Fir with Gary Mead

Balsam Fir with Gary Mead

January 28, 2021
On tonight's show, we'll discuss the balsam fir tree with Gary Mead; It's that fragrant tree that can often be found growing on the summits of some of our higher mountaintops. As always, Gary brings along his experience in using the wood and its other unique characteristics. 
 
Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a tree growing in our Catskill Mountains. Gary is the local owner of Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.
Apple Tree Pruning

Apple Tree Pruning

January 21, 2021

We're now deeply into the dormant season, and while most outdoor work waits for the spring, pruning occurs now. January through March is a great time to prune apple and pear trees. We'll discuss general apple tree pruning with an emphasis on restoring a long neglected apple tree. 

Managing Deer & Deer Impacts with Cornell University’s Paul Curtis

Managing Deer & Deer Impacts with Cornell University’s Paul Curtis

January 14, 2021
Dr. Paul Curtis will be discussing the most influential (two) creatures in the forest--deer and humans. Paul will go into various topics mainly surrounding deer/deer impacts such as:

  1. The role of deer hunting in deer management.
  2. Evaluating deer impacts to forest regeneration and biodiversity.
  3. Efforts needed to reduce deer abundance to target goals.
  4. Impacts of deer in the Catskills and ADKs vs. other parts of the state.
  5. How does one measure deer management success?
  6. Relationship between deer abundance and deer impacts.
  7. Fencing to protect forest regeneration/slash walls.
With a PhD in Zoology from North Carolina State University, Dr Paul Curtis is now a Professor in the Department of Natural Resources at Cornell University. He has coordinated the Wildlife Damage Management Programme at Cornell for the past 30 years, which focuses on reducing conflicts, economic losses and human health and safety concerns caused by wildlife in both rural and suburban landscapes. His work includes wildlife fertility control and population management, community-based wildlife management issues and public education. Dr Curtis is also testing novel methods for reducing wildlife damage to agricultural crops and forest regeneration.
The River Otter

The River Otter

January 8, 2021

Tune in tonight for a great show on the river otter.

Firewood & Firewood Heating Appliances

Firewood & Firewood Heating Appliances

December 31, 2020
It's that time of year again--winter. Temperatures are plummeting into the single digits at night. In fact, my car thermometer reached -1 degrees coming over Highmount, Ulster County last week. We have already received more snowfall this winter than last year; Although that isn't saying too much. 
In any case, we'll be discussing one way to bare the winter by staying warm--heating with firewood. We'll start with the firewood itself: Benefits and costs, and how might you get the most out of it. We'll finish with examples of "heating appliances" or types of stoves and efficient ways in which to burn firewood.
Grading Trees from Stump to Lumber with Gary Mead

Grading Trees from Stump to Lumber with Gary Mead

December 26, 2020
On tonight's show, we'll the ins & outs of how trees are "valued" for timber, from the time they're on the stump to after they've been processed into lumber.
 
Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a tree growing in our Catskill Moutains. Gary is the former owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill & present owner of Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.
The Flying Squirrel

The Flying Squirrel

December 10, 2020
I've seen coyotes, bear, turkey, deer, fox, and more; I never tire of seeing any of these guys, especially deer. However, one of the most memorable wildlife experiences to this day, is the flying squirrels I saw one day while my friend cut down a large sugar maple over a house. I got to watch about 8 or so of these little guys exit the tree in broad daylight and glide their way over to another maple tree about 50 yards away. They are the coolest little pilots I've ever seen.
On tonight's show, we'll discuss two flying squirrels that reside in New York State--Southern flying squirrel & Northern flying squirrel.
Maple & Oak Don’t Mix

Maple & Oak Don’t Mix

December 4, 2020
Some things seem to go together: Silver & gold, pen & pencil, peanut-butter & jelly, maple syrup & pancakes, steak & potatoes, Rip Van Winkle & the Catskills, wine & cheese. In the forest, there are things that seem to go to together too: Hemlock & brook trout, acorn tree & white-tailed deer, gray squirrel & hickory nut, shady forest & chanterelle, black bear in a black cherry tree. 
However, there are some things--even in the forest--that don't go together. Maple & Oak serve as one. Wherever the two are found, one seems to be doing better at the expense of the other. We'll cover why this is, and how it is--in my opinion--one of the more significant matters in today's forest.
Trees that Begin with “Black”

Trees that Begin with “Black”

December 4, 2020
On tonight's show, we'll discuss trees that begin with "black" with Gary Mead. Some that come to mind include black birch, black walnut, black locust, black cherry, black spruce, and more. As always, Gary brings along his experience in using the wood and its characteristics. 
 
Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a tree growing in our Catskill Moutains. Gary is the local owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill & Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.
 
All About Opossum

All About Opossum

November 20, 2020

On this week's show, we'll discuss North America's only marsupial--the opossum. I saw one of these little guys late at night a few days ago going after some of my food scraps. Those beady eyes and white face, with its "pacing gait" as it lumbered away, caught my attention. 

We'll talk about this unique animal's biology, reproduction, range, diet, behavior, habitat, ecological importance and more.

Venison From the Forest to Table

Venison From the Forest to Table

November 12, 2020

We're entering the heart of deer hunting season; From about Halloween to the middle of November, and that means (hopefully) that venison is on the way. On this week's show we'll discuss some of the work that begins once the deer is down, so that a dish of fine venison can be up on the table. 

Managing A Family Woodlot with Frank Winkler & Mike Porter

Managing A Family Woodlot with Frank Winkler & Mike Porter

November 12, 2020

Frank and Mike are both directors of the Catskill Forest Association. Each of them own woodlots in Andes, NY and coincidentally those properties are nearly across the street from one another. We will discuss with them the long term management strategies they are implementing, what their goals, troubles, and rewards have been and also discuss how harvesting trees fits into their long term goals.

Larch (Tamarack) with Gary Mead

Larch (Tamarack) with Gary Mead

November 12, 2020
On tonight's show, we'll discuss the larch or tamarack tree with Gary Mead; It's that exception-to-the-rule "evergreen" tree that loses its needles each year. As always, Gary brings along his experience in using the wood and its characteristics. 
 
Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a tree growing in our Catskill Moutains. Gary is the local owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill & Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.
The Importance of Family Forests in NY’s Economy

The Importance of Family Forests in NY’s Economy

October 22, 2020
State University of New York (SUNY) College of Environmental Science & Forestry's (ESF) Hugh Canham will be discussing the important role forest owners play in New York State. Hugh will cover important topics such as:

(1) Who owns the family forests & woods in NYS
(2) Why people own woods in NYS
(3) The diversity of forests in NYS
(4) Changes in ownership and uses of the forests over time
(5) What family forests contribute to the NYS economy & environment
(6) How woodland owners can get information on managing their woods

 

Dr. Canham is Professor Emeritus at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry where he taught and conducted research in forest and resource economics for over 30 years.  He has done extensive research in forest land ownership, regional economic impacts, forest taxation, and New York forestry.  His teachings embrace land use economics, the economics of non-market goods, and integrated forest management.  He has served as consultant to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Northern Forest Lands Council, Tug Hill Commission, United States Department of Agriculture, and New York City Catskill Watershed Agriculture Council.  He is the author of five articles in the Encyclopedia of New York, several entries in the Encyclopedia of American Forest and Conservation History and published a history of the 100-year-old Empire State Forest Products Association.  In addition, he has published in several refereed journals and has several monographs dealing with forest resources and the forest products industry both in New York and the United States.  Since his retirement he has focused on history and has made several presentations to the New York State Historical Society annual conferences on various subjects pertaining to New York State forestry and the unique relationship between the College of Environmental Science and Forestry and Syracuse University, which has been published in the book, SUNY at 60 Years.  He is the author of the 100 Year History of the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry.  He has just finished an updated look at the forest economy of New York entitled Just the Facts: The Past, Present, & Future of New York’s Forest & Forest Products, in conjunction with the Empire State Forest Products Association and New York Forest Owners Association.
 
Dr. Canham received all his degrees at the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry:
                        Bachelor of Science, General Forestry – 1960
                        Master of Science, Photogrammetry – 1962
                        Doctor of Philosophy, Forestry Economics – 1971
 
Dr. Canham is a member of the New York Forest Owners Association, a fellow in the Society of American Foresters, and an honorary member of the Empire State Forest Products Association.  He resides at Ballston Spa New York.
Forest Ranger Joseph Bink

Forest Ranger Joseph Bink

October 15, 2020
On this week's show we'll talk to New York State DEC Forest Ranger Joseph Bink. He covers Delaware County within "Region 4." 
Forest rangers are sworn police officers, who work within an assigned geographic area, and enforce provisions of the Environmental Conservation Law (ECL) in order to protect and enhance the State's lands and natural resources and the well-being of the public who use these resources. 

Forest Rangers organize and conduct search and rescue operations; educate the public in wilderness safety and natural resource care; and administer the State's wildland fire-management program, including wildfire suppression and prescribed fire activities.

Ryan’s Trip in the Woods (2020)

Ryan’s Trip in the Woods (2020)

October 15, 2020

Each year, FROM THE FOREST's Ryan Trapani, takes a few days to camp at some of his favorite places in the Catskills. We'll discuss Ryan's trip, from start to finish. We'll begin with preparation for such a camp-out, things to do while out in the woods, notable observations and wrapping things up. 

Tree Bark with Gary Mead

Tree Bark with Gary Mead

October 15, 2020

This week on From the Forest we will be talking to Gary Mead about tree bark. Bark can be utilized in many different ways, yet often times gets overlooked and discarded. We will ask Gary about his experiences using tree bark building his home, amongst other uses.

The Woodlanders with Costa Boutsikaris

The Woodlanders with Costa Boutsikaris

September 24, 2020

We'll speak to Film Director--Costa Boutsikaris--about his online film series about those that make their living, "from the forest." Costa is the Film Director of "The Woodlanders."

"WOODLANDERS IS AN ONLINE FILM SERIES THAT SEEKS TO DOCUMENT THE WORK OF PEOPLE WHO CARE FOR AND DEPEND ON FORESTS FOR THEIR LIVELIHOOD AND WELL-BEING THROUGHOUT THE WORLD." 

"EVEN AMONG TODAY'S PROGRESSIVE MOVEMENTS OF LOCAL ECONOMY AND FOOD SYSTEMS, THE VAST GLOBAL KNOWLEDGE OF FOREST LIVELIHOODS AND ECONOMIES ARE MOSTLY UNDERVALUED AND UNDOCUMENTED. FROM WOODCRAFT AND NUT TREE CULTURES OF ANCIENT EUROPE, TO MUSHROOM AND FOREST MEDICINES OF ASIA, THERE MANY FASCINATING WAYS OF CREATING SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIES FROM THE FORESTS WHILE MAINTAINING THEIR ECOLOGICAL HEALTH AND COMPLEXITY."

Costa is a native of the Hudson River Valley in New York. His studies in visual arts coupled with a deep fascination in permaculture and ecological design has led him to focus on sharing these insights through digital storytelling.
Forestry with Forester Laurie Raskin

Forestry with Forester Laurie Raskin

September 10, 2020
On this week's FROM THE FOREST radio show, we'll be interviewing DHW Forest Consulting, LLC's--Laurie Raskin. Laurie is a private Consulting Forester serving forest owners in the Hudson Valley/Catskill Region/Central NY. 

Laurie is a graduate from the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and earned a degree in Forest Resource Management. 

​She helps landowners achieve their goals, and strives to implement forest management that is ecologically sound, socially acceptable, and financially feasible.

Laurie is a member of the NY Society of American Foresters, a member of the NYS DEC Cooperating Foresters program and the NYS Watershed Agricultural Council. 

Tent Caterpillar Pests & Look Alikes

Tent Caterpillar Pests & Look Alikes

September 3, 2020

Maybe you've seen a couple of "tents" in your apple or hickory trees and are wondering what it is. Or perhaps you've noticed one of your trees is missing its leaves. On this week's show we'll cover "tent caterpillars", including their biology and impacts, as well as some management too.

Black Walnut with Gary Mead

Black Walnut with Gary Mead

August 27, 2020
On tonight's show, we'll discuss the black walnut tree with Gary Mead. We'll discuss its importance to both humans, wildlife, where they grow and can be found. As always, Gary brings along his experience in using the wood and its characteristics. 
 
Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a tree growing in our Catskill Moutains. Gary is the local owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill & Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.
Permaculture with Andrew Faust

Permaculture with Andrew Faust

August 20, 2020

On this week's show, we'll talk to Andrew Faust, Founder & Director of the Center for BioRegional Living in Ellenville, Ulster County, NY. Andrew is a teacher and practitioner of Permaculture. What's Permaculture? One definition is that it's "the development of agricultural ecosystems intended to be sustainable and self-sufficient." We'll see how Andrew defines it.

Andrew is considered one of the premier Permaculture teachers and designers in North America with over two decades of experience in the field. His passionate and mind expanding talks and curriculum have motivated teachers, students since his decade long career as a H.S. teacher at Upattina's, a open community free school in Glenmoore, PA. View Faust's TED X lecture. 

Andrew created his own Permaculture Ph'd project, in 1999, a fully off grid, Straw Bale educational center in Pocahontas County W.V. He moved to Brooklyn in 2007 and has been applying his knowledge to the urban landscape.Faust has been inspiring film makers with the message of Permaculture culminating in the film: Inhabit,  and a life changing Permaculture Design Certification course, with over 500 graduates. Faust received a dual diploma in Design and Education from Permaculture Institute of North America in 2016. Andrew and Adriana Magaña with their daughter Juniper run the Center for Bioregional Living in Ellenville, NY., a hands-on educational campus for students and clients.

Andrew Faust, a visionary permaculture and bioregional educator taps into the rich synergy between permaculture and biodynamic agriculture which he has been studying with a focus on orchards since he completed his permaculture design training in 1996.  

Playing in the Woods with Mike Porter

Playing in the Woods with Mike Porter

August 13, 2020

 

Mike Porter is the President of the Catskill Forest Association. He is a lifelong resident of the Catskill Mountains and still loves to play in his woods. We are going to speak with Mike about his experiences growing up, buying forested land to play in, and what he has done throughout his lifetime to keep playing in the forests of the Catskill Mountains.

 

Meet the Timber Rattler

Meet the Timber Rattler

July 29, 2020

New York State has 3 poisonous snakes. One is the copperhead and the other two are rattlesnakes. The massasauga or "swamp rattler" is extremely rare; It is found in only 2 locations of central/western NYS. The timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) is larger and can be found in some areas of the Catskill Mountains and Shawangunk Ridge. The timber rattler is considered "threatened" in NYS, but its presence can still be found, like this one I almost stepped on last Sunday.

We'll describe this secretive snake, its biology, life history, feeding habits, and our thoughts on why its habitat seems to be fading away. We'll also cover how this interesting snake was also revered by America's Founding Fathers too and competed for the nation's symbol alongside the bald eagle.  

Paulownia with Gary Mead

Paulownia with Gary Mead

July 23, 2020
Paulownia with Gary Mead. This Week on From the Forest we will be speaking with Gary Mead about the paulownia tree (A.K.A. princess tree or empress tree). This tree is a non-native of the Catskill Mountains and rarely found. It has a bad wrap in some states where it has been deemed "invasive" and banned such as in Connecticut. However, according to the USDA, this tree is rarely invasive in most of the northeast, and really only can survive in extremely disturbed areas. Paulownia has been around since the mid 19th Century and it flowers and form are mesmerizing. The wood too is highly useful from this extremely fast-growing tree. Some like the American Paulownia Association highly revere this tree which used to be called "the magic tree" in the 1970s due to its multi-purpose nature. 
Every third Wednesday we have local sawmill owner and wood artist, Gary Mead, to discuss a different Catskill Tree species. Gary is the owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill and Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.  
Woodland Wildlife Habitat & More

Woodland Wildlife Habitat & More

July 16, 2020

On tonight's show we'll dicsuss mostly woodland wildlife habitat management or things that can be done in the forest to improve quality habitat for wildlife. We'll also discuss some things you can do in the "dooryard" or near the house to improve habitat as well.

Four Favorite Trees

Four Favorite Trees

July 9, 2020

On tonight's show we'll talk about our Four Favorite Trees; There might be an Honorable Mention. It's a difficult list to come up with, since we like so many trees of course. But, we had to narrow it down. What makes a tree a "favorite?" Maybe it's a memory of that tree as kid? Maybe it reminds you of something special? Maybe it has something edible about it. Or its shape, flowers, leaves, fall foliage, or bark stand out? Maybe you like the wildlife that it attracts, or the historical significance it brings? We'll see.

Catskill Heritage Brook Trout Study with SUNY Albany’s Dr. Spencer Bruce

Catskill Heritage Brook Trout Study with SUNY Albany’s Dr. Spencer Bruce

July 2, 2020
The New York State fish is the brook trout; Also known as "speckled trout" or "brookie." These little guys have attracted the praise from many a fisherman due to both their beautiful color-scheme and mountain-stream haunts. 

The Ashokan-Pepacton Watershed Chapter of Trout Unlimited recently retained the services of SUNY Albany Researcher & Teacher--Dr. Spencer Bruce--to study the genes of brook trout in one particular stream near West Shokan, Ulster County to find out just how "native" these brookies are. We'll find out. 

 
Dr. Spencer Bruce is currently working as a postdoctoral researcher at the University at Albany where he employs genetic and genomic approaches to elucidate the ways in which landscape ecology and habitat heterogeneity shape population structure. His current research ranges from aquatic population genetics to wildlife disease genomics, with an emphasis on applicability in the context of biodiversity preservation and wildlife conservation. 

Dr. Bruce holds a Doctorate in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, as well as a Master of Science in Biodiversity, Conservation & Policy. He has over six years of experience teaching at the college level and has worked as an adjunct faculty member at multiple institutions. His previous and current research program emphasizes the participation and mentoring of a diverse array of students at both the undergraduate and graduate level.

Understanding A Forest Through Trees

Understanding A Forest Through Trees

June 25, 2020

We have discussed "Forest Forensics" or "Reading the Forested Landscape" with Author & Professor--Tom Wessels before. In that episode, Tom extensively goes into observations about trees, terrain-factors, stone walls, and more to gain insight about the history of a forest in New England. In this episode, we'll stick to mainly the trees. We'll cover one example-forest in Ulster County to illustrate how you might tell which trees grew first, second, and third and what might have caused them to grow in the first place and afterwards.

Mountain Top Arboretum with Marc Wolf

Mountain Top Arboretum with Marc Wolf

June 11, 2020

Mountain Top Arboretum is a public garden in the Catskill Mountains dedicated to displaying and managing native plant communities of the northeastern US, in addition to curating its collection of cold-hardy native and exotic trees. Its mountain top elevation of 2,400 feet at the top of the New York City Watershed creates a unique environment for education, research and pure enjoyment of the spectacular and historic Catskills landscape. The Arboretum trails and boardwalks connect 178 acres of plant collections, natural meadows, wetlands, forest and Devonian bedrock—a natural sanctuary for visitors interested in horticulture, birding, geology, local craftsmanship, hiking and snowshoeing!

Marc Wolf is Mountain Top Arboretum's Executive Director.

Podbean App

Play this podcast on Podbean App