From The Forest
The Woodlanders with Costa Boutsikaris

The Woodlanders with Costa Boutsikaris

September 24, 2020

We'll speak to Film Director--Costa Boutsikaris--about his online film series about those that make their living, "from the forest." Costa is the Film Director of "The Woodlanders."

"WOODLANDERS IS AN ONLINE FILM SERIES THAT SEEKS TO DOCUMENT THE WORK OF PEOPLE WHO CARE FOR AND DEPEND ON FORESTS FOR THEIR LIVELIHOOD AND WELL-BEING THROUGHOUT THE WORLD." 

"EVEN AMONG TODAY'S PROGRESSIVE MOVEMENTS OF LOCAL ECONOMY AND FOOD SYSTEMS, THE VAST GLOBAL KNOWLEDGE OF FOREST LIVELIHOODS AND ECONOMIES ARE MOSTLY UNDERVALUED AND UNDOCUMENTED. FROM WOODCRAFT AND NUT TREE CULTURES OF ANCIENT EUROPE, TO MUSHROOM AND FOREST MEDICINES OF ASIA, THERE MANY FASCINATING WAYS OF CREATING SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIES FROM THE FORESTS WHILE MAINTAINING THEIR ECOLOGICAL HEALTH AND COMPLEXITY."

Costa is a native of the Hudson River Valley in New York. His studies in visual arts coupled with a deep fascination in permaculture and ecological design has led him to focus on sharing these insights through digital storytelling.
Forestry with Forester Laurie Raskin

Forestry with Forester Laurie Raskin

September 10, 2020
On this week's FROM THE FOREST radio show, we'll be interviewing DHW Forest Consulting, LLC's--Laurie Raskin. Laurie is a private Consulting Forester serving forest owners in the Hudson Valley/Catskill Region/Central NY. 

Laurie is a graduate from the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and earned a degree in Forest Resource Management. 

​She helps landowners achieve their goals, and strives to implement forest management that is ecologically sound, socially acceptable, and financially feasible.

Laurie is a member of the NY Society of American Foresters, a member of the NYS DEC Cooperating Foresters program and the NYS Watershed Agricultural Council. 

Tent Caterpillar Pests & Look Alikes

Tent Caterpillar Pests & Look Alikes

September 3, 2020

Maybe you've seen a couple of "tents" in your apple or hickory trees and are wondering what it is. Or perhaps you've noticed one of your trees is missing its leaves. On this week's show we'll cover "tent caterpillars", including their biology and impacts, as well as some management too.

Black Walnut with Gary Mead

Black Walnut with Gary Mead

August 27, 2020
On tonight's show, we'll discuss the black walnut tree with Gary Mead. We'll discuss its importance to both humans, wildlife, where they grow and can be found. As always, Gary brings along his experience in using the wood and its characteristics. 
 
Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a tree growing in our Catskill Moutains. Gary is the local owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill & Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.
Permaculture with Andrew Faust

Permaculture with Andrew Faust

August 20, 2020

On this week's show, we'll talk to Andrew Faust, Founder & Director of the Center for BioRegional Living in Ellenville, Ulster County, NY. Andrew is a teacher and practitioner of Permaculture. What's Permaculture? One definition is that it's "the development of agricultural ecosystems intended to be sustainable and self-sufficient." We'll see how Andrew defines it.

Andrew is considered one of the premier Permaculture teachers and designers in North America with over two decades of experience in the field. His passionate and mind expanding talks and curriculum have motivated teachers, students since his decade long career as a H.S. teacher at Upattina's, a open community free school in Glenmoore, PA. View Faust's TED X lecture. 

Andrew created his own Permaculture Ph'd project, in 1999, a fully off grid, Straw Bale educational center in Pocahontas County W.V. He moved to Brooklyn in 2007 and has been applying his knowledge to the urban landscape.Faust has been inspiring film makers with the message of Permaculture culminating in the film: Inhabit,  and a life changing Permaculture Design Certification course, with over 500 graduates. Faust received a dual diploma in Design and Education from Permaculture Institute of North America in 2016. Andrew and Adriana Magaña with their daughter Juniper run the Center for Bioregional Living in Ellenville, NY., a hands-on educational campus for students and clients.

Andrew Faust, a visionary permaculture and bioregional educator taps into the rich synergy between permaculture and biodynamic agriculture which he has been studying with a focus on orchards since he completed his permaculture design training in 1996.  

Playing in the Woods with Mike Porter

Playing in the Woods with Mike Porter

August 13, 2020

 

Mike Porter is the President of the Catskill Forest Association. He is a lifelong resident of the Catskill Mountains and still loves to play in his woods. We are going to speak with Mike about his experiences growing up, buying forested land to play in, and what he has done throughout his lifetime to keep playing in the forests of the Catskill Mountains.

 

Meet the Timber Rattler

Meet the Timber Rattler

July 29, 2020

New York State has 3 poisonous snakes. One is the copperhead and the other two are rattlesnakes. The massasauga or "swamp rattler" is extremely rare; It is found in only 2 locations of central/western NYS. The timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) is larger and can be found in some areas of the Catskill Mountains and Shawangunk Ridge. The timber rattler is considered "threatened" in NYS, but its presence can still be found, like this one I almost stepped on last Sunday.

We'll describe this secretive snake, its biology, life history, feeding habits, and our thoughts on why its habitat seems to be fading away. We'll also cover how this interesting snake was also revered by America's Founding Fathers too and competed for the nation's symbol alongside the bald eagle.  

Paulownia with Gary Mead

Paulownia with Gary Mead

July 23, 2020
Paulownia with Gary Mead. This Week on From the Forest we will be speaking with Gary Mead about the paulownia tree (A.K.A. princess tree or empress tree). This tree is a non-native of the Catskill Mountains and rarely found. It has a bad wrap in some states where it has been deemed "invasive" and banned such as in Connecticut. However, according to the USDA, this tree is rarely invasive in most of the northeast, and really only can survive in extremely disturbed areas. Paulownia has been around since the mid 19th Century and it flowers and form are mesmerizing. The wood too is highly useful from this extremely fast-growing tree. Some like the American Paulownia Association highly revere this tree which used to be called "the magic tree" in the 1970s due to its multi-purpose nature. 
Every third Wednesday we have local sawmill owner and wood artist, Gary Mead, to discuss a different Catskill Tree species. Gary is the owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill and Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.  
Woodland Wildlife Habitat & More

Woodland Wildlife Habitat & More

July 16, 2020

On tonight's show we'll dicsuss mostly woodland wildlife habitat management or things that can be done in the forest to improve quality habitat for wildlife. We'll also discuss some things you can do in the "dooryard" or near the house to improve habitat as well.

Four Favorite Trees

Four Favorite Trees

July 9, 2020

On tonight's show we'll talk about our Four Favorite Trees; There might be an Honorable Mention. It's a difficult list to come up with, since we like so many trees of course. But, we had to narrow it down. What makes a tree a "favorite?" Maybe it's a memory of that tree as kid? Maybe it reminds you of something special? Maybe it has something edible about it. Or its shape, flowers, leaves, fall foliage, or bark stand out? Maybe you like the wildlife that it attracts, or the historical significance it brings? We'll see.

Catskill Heritage Brook Trout Study with SUNY Albany’s Dr. Spencer Bruce

Catskill Heritage Brook Trout Study with SUNY Albany’s Dr. Spencer Bruce

July 2, 2020
The New York State fish is the brook trout; Also known as "speckled trout" or "brookie." These little guys have attracted the praise from many a fisherman due to both their beautiful color-scheme and mountain-stream haunts. 

The Ashokan-Pepacton Watershed Chapter of Trout Unlimited recently retained the services of SUNY Albany Researcher & Teacher--Dr. Spencer Bruce--to study the genes of brook trout in one particular stream near West Shokan, Ulster County to find out just how "native" these brookies are. We'll find out. 

 
Dr. Spencer Bruce is currently working as a postdoctoral researcher at the University at Albany where he employs genetic and genomic approaches to elucidate the ways in which landscape ecology and habitat heterogeneity shape population structure. His current research ranges from aquatic population genetics to wildlife disease genomics, with an emphasis on applicability in the context of biodiversity preservation and wildlife conservation. 

Dr. Bruce holds a Doctorate in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, as well as a Master of Science in Biodiversity, Conservation & Policy. He has over six years of experience teaching at the college level and has worked as an adjunct faculty member at multiple institutions. His previous and current research program emphasizes the participation and mentoring of a diverse array of students at both the undergraduate and graduate level.

Understanding A Forest Through Trees

Understanding A Forest Through Trees

June 25, 2020

We have discussed "Forest Forensics" or "Reading the Forested Landscape" with Author & Professor--Tom Wessels before. In that episode, Tom extensively goes into observations about trees, terrain-factors, stone walls, and more to gain insight about the history of a forest in New England. In this episode, we'll stick to mainly the trees. We'll cover one example-forest in Ulster County to illustrate how you might tell which trees grew first, second, and third and what might have caused them to grow in the first place and afterwards.

Mountain Top Arboretum with Marc Wolf

Mountain Top Arboretum with Marc Wolf

June 11, 2020

Mountain Top Arboretum is a public garden in the Catskill Mountains dedicated to displaying and managing native plant communities of the northeastern US, in addition to curating its collection of cold-hardy native and exotic trees. Its mountain top elevation of 2,400 feet at the top of the New York City Watershed creates a unique environment for education, research and pure enjoyment of the spectacular and historic Catskills landscape. The Arboretum trails and boardwalks connect 178 acres of plant collections, natural meadows, wetlands, forest and Devonian bedrock—a natural sanctuary for visitors interested in horticulture, birding, geology, local craftsmanship, hiking and snowshoeing!

Marc Wolf is Mountain Top Arboretum's Executive Director.

Turkeys & Turkey Hunting

Turkeys & Turkey Hunting

June 4, 2020

May 1st through May 31st is hunting season for some in New York State; It marks the spring turkey season. Unlike in the fall, spring turkey hunting includes a lot of "action" since turkeys can be "called" in. Responsive gobblers in an otherwise quiet forest is a memory not easily forgotten. We'll discuss some basic biology of the eastern wild turkey as well as hunting techniques, stories, and more.

White Oak with Gary Mead

White Oak with Gary Mead

May 28, 2020

WIOX From the Forest – Catskill Trees with Gary Mead – white oak and more. This Week on From the Forest we will be speaking with Gary Mead about white oak trees, their uses, where they grow, as well as what wood products they provide. 
 
Every third Wednesday we have local sawmill owner and wood artist, Gary Mead, to discuss a different Catskill Tree species. Gary is the owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill and Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.  

SuperSplitter–The Original Kinetic Log Splitter with Owner Paul McCann

SuperSplitter–The Original Kinetic Log Splitter with Owner Paul McCann

May 21, 2020

Ever hear about a kinetic wood-splitter before? One of our members told me years ago that if he were beginning his "career" again in firewood, he would buy a kinetic wood-splitter over the more well-known hydraulic splitter. More recently I was reading an article about these wood-splitters in "Independent Sawmill & Woodlot Management" magazine and I came across SuperSplitter, Inc. who makes them. After looking into them a little bit, they do seem promising.

Paul McCann is the owner of SuperSplitter, Inc. and holds the patent on the original kinetic wood-splitter since 1978. Paul, his son Connor, and wife Maureen run SuperSplitter, Inc. in West Bridgewater, MA near Boston. We'll ask Paul about his patented design and if it might fit your firewood needs too.

Paul McCann is the Owner and President of SuperSplitter, Inc. From the ground up, the SuperSplit kinetic splitter is made in the USA. And while they have added many employees over the years in order to keep up with demand, they are still a family owned and operated business. For decades they have made the SuperSplit kinetic splitter, and know it inside and out (and, yes, Paul still makes them with his own hands).

Wild Bees, Trees, & More with Cornell University’s Kass Urban-Mead

Wild Bees, Trees, & More with Cornell University’s Kass Urban-Mead

May 14, 2020
You might be familiar with the beautifully industrious honey bee brought to North America in the 1600s. However, according to Cornell University's--Kass Urban-Mead--New York State is home to over 400 species of native wild bees. Kass has been busy climbing up into trees and discovering the increasingly important role they play in pollinating plants across the landscape. Who knew there were so many bees?
Kass is a PhD Candidate in the Danforth & McArt labs in the Cornell University Entomology Department. She is interested in sustainable land management for insect conservation, particularly in agriculture & forestry. Kass's dissertation explores the landscape, nutritional, network, and community ecology of wild bees in agro-ecosystems. Kass climbs into temperate tree canopies to research how forest resources are used by orchard-pollinating wild bee species. She has found that the details of the lives of bees open an endlessly complex avenue to explore humans’ relationship with the land.
What’s Up with Bats with Batman Tim Carter

What’s Up with Bats with Batman Tim Carter

May 14, 2020
In the last decade or so, bats have taken quite a hit. For instance, it's estimated that the Indiana bat's population has been reduced by 95%. The disease known as "white nose syndrome" seems to be the main culprit. Ball State University's--Tim Carter--has been extensively researching the bats, the disease, and management practices in hope of brining back the bats. We'll find out from Tim; He is "Batman."

Dr. Tim Carter is currently the Chair of Environment, Geology, and Natural Resources Department and Director of Field Stations and Environmental Education Center and Professor of Biology at Ball State University. He teaches courses in wildlife biology and mammology and serves as curator for the Ball State University Mammalogy Collection.

Tim's research focuses on non-game and endangered species and how land management affects these animal populations. In particular, he has studied the federally endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) with a focus on identifying and delineating critical summer habitats as well as examining winter hibernation habitats. Recently, he has worked more closely with Urban Ecology, studying the ecology and management of over abundant species such as deer and geese.

Outdoor Education with CFA Board President Mike Porter

Outdoor Education with CFA Board President Mike Porter

May 7, 2020

Mike is a retired Earth Science teacher and his day-to-day activities are mostly "from the forest" where he draws inspiration and support from, especially during these difficult times. Since the pandemic began and people have been forced to stay at home, Mike has been writing a letter each week to members on how they might learn and enjoy the trees/forest near and around them with their family. In his letters, Mike has made recommendations on what to look for in the woods, such as making collections of plants for the kids, identifying birds, trees, and wildflowers or where to take hike. I know I've learned a lot from Mike and we hope you can too.

Mike is a retired teacher from Margaretville Central School. He taught Earth Science, Environmental Science, Science Research in the High School, Driver Education and several elementary and junior high courses over his 33-year career. In 1988 he was selected as the New York State Conservation Teacher of the Year by the New York State Board of Soil and Water Districts. A life-long resident of Delaware County, Mike is an avid birder and has studied the changes in the avian community over the years.

As a small woodlot landowner, he has learned to manage his property to better enhance wildlife, timber quality and maple syrup production. Mike has been an active volunteer Fireman for nearly 45 years and was an Executive officer for most of that time. He was a member of the Town of Middletown Zoning Board of Appeals and, later, a Planning Board member and Chair. Besides birding, Mike gardens, makes Maple syrup, cuts his own firewood and does woodworking. Currently, he is harvesting trees from his property and preparing his own lumber via a bandsaw mill on the property.

What is Nature to You with Gary Mead

What is Nature to You with Gary Mead

April 23, 2020

Every third Wednesday we speak with local wood artist Gary Mead. Gary is the owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill and Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY. This month we will talk about what being in "Nature" means to each of us and how we get out in the woods. For some, the vast wilderness can be the patch of woods behind our homes, for others it means a weekend trip backpacking in 3-5 miles off the road.

Finding Spirit in the Forest with Catskill Mountain Woodsman_Hoppy Quick

Finding Spirit in the Forest with Catskill Mountain Woodsman_Hoppy Quick

April 18, 2020

The forest and mountains are old friends to local Catskill Mountain Woodsman--Hoppy Quick. Although, during these vulnerable times when many are practicing "social distancing", Hoppy finds the forest a peaceful home to strengthen his spirit and quiet any fears. Hoppy has been on the show numerous times before including topics describing his famous and realistic chainsaw carvings, "defining rural", "stories from the forest", and "Hoppy Goes to NYC." On Wednesday's show we'll ask Hoppy about how he defines "spirit" that's "from the forest."

Hoppy Quick was born & raised in West Shokan, Ulster County. He still resides in the Town of Olive where he continues to carve his famously realistic--and "spirit-animal"--the black bear. Hoppy has recently gained quite a following on his daily Facebook Live Stream where he can be seen fishing near the Ashokan Reservoir, or up some mountain or other engaging people both locally and internationally about his relation to others, the environment and of course his spiritual beliefs.

Floodplains & Forests with Resource Educator–Brent Gotsch

Floodplains & Forests with Resource Educator–Brent Gotsch

April 9, 2020

On this week's show we'll discuss the intersection of streams, floodplains, and forests with Resource Educator--Brent Gotsch--from the Ashokan Watershed Stream Management Program.

Brent Gotsch is a Resource Educator with the Ashokan Watershed Stream Management Program (AWSMP) where he specializes in flood hazard mitigation trainings. He has been a Certified Floodplain Manager (CFM) since 2012. Most of his programming revolves around helping communities become more resilient to flooding and other natural disasters and to stay in compliance with the National Flood Insurance Program. He also helps to organize and implement community programming around stream management and watershed science topics.

In his spare time he enjoys being outdoors, especially on his family’s Christmas Tree farm located in-between the Rondout and Neversink Reservoirs in Sullivan County, NY. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree and a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

2020 Backyard Sugaring Report

2020 Backyard Sugaring Report

April 2, 2020

That's right. Those are maple buckets no longer hanging out on the tree, but stacked and stored for next season, which means this year is already over for many maple producers. On this Wednesday's show, we'll summarize this early maple season: How it began; How it went; & How much we made. We'll also cover some backyard sugaring pitfalls and tips we've learned along the way since 2007.

Catskill Trees with Gary Mead_Sycamore & Photosynthesis

Catskill Trees with Gary Mead_Sycamore & Photosynthesis

April 2, 2020

WIOX From the Forest – Catskill Trees with Gary Mead – Sycamore and More. This Week on From the Forest we will be speaking with Gary Mead about Sycamore trees, their uses, where they grow, as well as what wood products they provide. Gary also wants to touch on Photosynthesis and sycamore syrup and more!

Every third Wednesday we have local sawmill owner and wood artist, Gary Mead, to discuss a different Catskill Tree species. Gary is the owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill and Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.

Role of Forest Products & Biomass-Based Energy on Climate Change with Robert Malmsheimer

Role of Forest Products & Biomass-Based Energy on Climate Change with Robert Malmsheimer

March 19, 2020
SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry's Robert Malmsheimer will discuss (1) Climate change and why it's occurring; (2) The role of forest products in addressing climate change; (3) The role of forest biomass energy in addressing climate change; & (4) Other important aspects  surrounding the significance of  markets, feedstock for the bioeconomy, and bioenergy carbon capture and storage.
Robert Malmsheimer is a Professor of Forest Policy & Law at the State University of New York's College of Environmental Science & Forestry (SUNY ESF) in Syracuse. He is the Associate Chair of the Department of Forest & Natural Resources Management. He has earned his Ph.D. from SUNY ESF in 1999 and his J.D. from the Albany Law School, Union University in 1989. His Areas of Study include US Forest & Natural Resources Policy & Law; & Biomass Carbon Accounting Policies & their Affect on US Natural Resources. Courses taught include Natural Resources Policy; Business Law; Environmental Law & Policy; & Natural Resources Law.
Backyard Sugaring with CFA Board President Mike Porter

Backyard Sugaring with CFA Board President Mike Porter

March 19, 2020

This weeks show we will be talking to Catskill Forest Association’s Board President Mike Porter about Maple Sugaring at the smallest scales: In the Backyard. Mike and John each boil maple sap on the non-commercial scales. We will keep the discussion geared towards the equipment we use, what we look for differently than a commercial operation, when we tap, and much more.

Tree Planting

Tree Planting

March 19, 2020

There is a saying that "the best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago."  I would add that the best time to plant a tree is not only about timing, but matching the "correct" tree to the right site. For instance, my apple trees are doing alright, but heavy clay is a struggle to drain. On this week's show we'll discuss some basics surrounding TREE PLANTING. I just got back from a training at Rutgers University and will share some new information arborists are using in planting trees.

Ancient Fossil Forests of the Catskills with Dr. Chris Berry

Ancient Fossil Forests of the Catskills with Dr. Chris Berry

February 29, 2020

Scientists from Binghamton University, Cardiff University, and New York State Museum have reported the discovery of the floor of the world's oldest forest, right here in the Catskill Mountains of Gilboa, Schoharie County. "It was like discovering the botanical equivalent of dinosaur footprints," said Dr. William Stein, associate professor of biological sciences at Binghamton University. "But the most exciting part was finding out just how many different types of footprints there were. The newly uncovered area was preserved in such a way that we were literally able to walk among the trees, noting what kind they were, where they had stood and how big they had grown." Scientists are now piecing together a view of this ancient site, dating back about 385 million years ago, which could shed new light on the role of modern-day forests and their impact on climate change.

We'll be interviewing Cardiff University's Dr. Chris Berry about his research on this ancient forest in Gilboa. What kind of plants did they find? What was this ancient forest floor like? What do these ancient plants tell us about the climate back then?

Dr. Chris Berry is a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Earth and Ocean Sciences - School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University (1998-present). Dr. Berry was a Research Fellow at the University of Wales, Cardiff University (1996-1998); Royal Society Exchange Fellowship, Liège University (1994-1995); and earned his PhD - Devonian Plant Fossils from Venezuela, Geology Department, Cardiff University (1993) and BA Earth Sciences – Cambridge University (1989).

Dr. Berry specializes in understanding the early radiation of large plants and birth of forest ecosystems in the Devonian Period (380 million years ago).

Wintergreen Fern with SUNY Delhi’s Jack Tessier

Wintergreen Fern with SUNY Delhi’s Jack Tessier

February 29, 2020
SUNY Delhi's Jack Tessier will discuss wintergreen ferns. Ever see ferns buried in the snow and still retaining their green pigment? Those are wintergreen ferns; one of the only plants that can photosynthesize when temperatures break above freezing during the winter or early spring. 
Jack Tessier is a professor at SUNY Delhi within the Liberal Arts & Sciences Department. His areas of expertise are ecology, environment, teaching and learning. His research is in ecology, ecophysiology, and the natural history of plants, especially forest understory plants.
Apple Tree Pruning & Grafting

Apple Tree Pruning & Grafting

February 6, 2020

January through March is the time to prune apple trees. During the same time, we also gather scionwood or cuttings to be used in April/May for grafting onto apple trees. For this week's show, we'll talk about the basic apple tree pruning principles and how you might plan for the upcoming grafting season as well.

New Hampshire Fish & Game with Officer Nick Masucci

New Hampshire Fish & Game with Officer Nick Masucci

January 30, 2020

Nick Masucci, a former Forest Program Technician of the Catskill Forest Association, is now an officer with the New Hampshire Fish & Game Department. We'll ask Nick about his day-to-day duties up there in New England dealing with both wildlife and people. We also want to know about one particular animal that is legally hunted there in New Hampshire -- moose.

Oak Trees with Gary Mead

Oak Trees with Gary Mead

January 23, 2020

 

On tonight's show, we'll discuss Oak Trees with Gary Mead, both red and white. We haven't discussed their key differences and unique qualities of the two since 2013! Oak trees are divided into two groups -- red and white -- and we'll discuss the importance to both humans, wildlife, where they grow and can be found. As always, Gary brings along his experience in using the wood and its characteristics. 

 

Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a tree growing in our Catskill Moutains. Gary is the local owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill & Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.
Herbicides & Forestry with PSU’s David Jackson

Herbicides & Forestry with PSU’s David Jackson

January 16, 2020
Pennsylvania State University's--David Jackson--will discuss how to control competing or interfering vegetation in the forest. Many of you are aware of how your goals can be thwarted from "weeds" in the woods. Examples include both native and non-native plants: New York fern, American beech, striped maple, Japanese stilt-grass, Japanese barberry, etc. 

David focuses on "Integrated Vegetation Management" that includes cultural controls, mechanical controls, biological controls, and chemical controls. Most of our talk will focus on chemical controls since herbicides--according to David--can be highly effective if used properly. 

Dave is currently a Forest Resources Educator for Penn State Extension covering a multi-county area throughout central Pennsylvania. Dave has been with Penn State in his current position since January 2002. His primary responsibilities are to deliver educational programs to private forest landowners, youth, and natural resource professionals.

Dave earned his Bachelor of Science degree from The College of Environmental Science and Forestry at Syracuse, New York in 1988 in the fields of forest resource management and forest biology. He completed a Master of Forest Resources degree at The Pennsylvania State University in August 2007. Dave’s master’s work focused on creating educational material on the use of herbicides in managing forest vegetation.
Prior to coming to Penn State Dave worked at various seasonal and temporary positions with the U.S Forest Service in Montana, Vermont, and Pennsylvania as well as with Boise Cascade Corporation in southwestern Oregon. Dave also spent a year working for the University of Kentucky on their teaching and research forest before accepting a position with the Virginia Department of Forestry in 1992 where he spent 8 years as a service forester. Dave left Virginia in 2000 to take a position with Forecon, Inc. Consulting Foresters as a field forester managing lands in the eastern Catskill Mountains of New York State.

Dave is currently a member of the Society of American Foresters, the Association of Natural Resource Extension Professionals, and the Pennsylvania Forestry Association. Dave currently serves as Inspector Training Coordinator for the Pennsylvania Tree Farm Committee. He is a board member for the Pennsylvania Forestry Association and serves on the Rothrock Chapter of the Society of American Foresters.

Logging with the Krickhahns

Logging with the Krickhahns

January 9, 2020

The practice of Logging is how wood is cut and brought out of the woods to meet society's demand for wood products; Yep, I just said "wood" three times. The Krickhahns are one such family that makes this happen. Paul Krickhahn, Jr. & his son Paul A. Krickhahn are full-time Catskill Mountain Loggers. Loggers are more than just cutters, they are what makes forest management possible, since most management relies upon cutting in order to manipulate sunlight and species composition. As one older Forester told me many years ago, "We need them more than they need us." I believe he's still right about that.

The Krickhahns own PGK Logging, Inc. and their home-base is in Roxbury, Delaware County. 

2019 Forest Wrap-Up

2019 Forest Wrap-Up

January 2, 2020

This will be our last radio show in 2019; Next Wednesday is Christmas Day & From the Forest will be on holiday. For this year's last show, Catskill Forest Association's President--Mike Porter--Ryan & John will recap or summarize their experiences surrounding the Catskill Mountain's forests. We'll summarize the year seasonally (winter, spring, summer, and fall), from apple tree pruning and grafting to tree and forest health, maple sugaring, wildlife management, trends in forest markets, and more.

Arboriculture with Arborist Charlie Blume

Arboriculture with Arborist Charlie Blume

December 19, 2019

Charlie is a Veteran-Arborist serving both Long Island & Sullivan County throughout the last few decades. We'll speak with Charlie about what he's learned about serving both trees and people in the Catskill Mountains, as someone that must balance the needs of trees with the customer's expectations. We'll also cover how to identify a "hazardous tree" as well as what a "healthy" tree might look like.

Surviving Winter

Surviving Winter

December 12, 2019

December 1st marked the unofficial Opening Day to winter across the Catskills & Hudson Valley due to the dumping of 8 to 15 inches of snow. Some of us have been busy plowing out our cars, driveways, and homes while feeding the woodstove to stay warm. But how does wildlife cope with winter's entry and presence for several months?

John and Ryan will discuss how wildlife "survives winter" from fur to seeking shelter in the "subnivean zone" of snow. Not sure what the word "subnivean" means? You'll just have to tune in.

Forests For Energy with Penn State University

Forests For Energy with Penn State University

December 11, 2019

How does wood energy stack up to other energy resources? We'll ask Penn State University's Dan Ciolkosz and Sarah Wurzbacher. Dan will describe the "energy systems" that surround woody biomass, while Sarah will talk more about how trees and forests can be managed for energy from a silvicultural and forestry point of view.

Dan Ciolkosz (Ph.D.) is an Assistant Professor of Agricultural & Biological Engineering at Penn State University. He is also an Academic Program Coordinator. His areas of expertise include bioenergy, biomass energy systems, thermochemical conversion, energy efficiency, controlled environment agriculture, and solar energy resources evaluation. 

Sarah Wurzbacher is an Penn State Extension Silviculturalist in North Central PA with extension experience in forest management relative to wood heat. Her areas of expertise include forest ecology, forest health, structural forest habitat management, bioenergy and bioproducts, and biomass crops.

Farms to Forest

Farms to Forest

December 4, 2019

Gary Mead grew up on a farm in Delaware County. Back then forests were of course around, but not as much as they are today. Most of the farms in Delaware County have been abandoned and reverted back to forests. Some of these farms have been abandoned so long, the trees growing on them are cut for sawlogs where once dairy cows and cauliflower grew. We'll get Gary's perspective on some of these changes, both bad and good.

Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a tree growing in our Catskill Mountains (or some other forest-related topic). Gary is the local owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill and Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.

Humans & Hunting with Amherst College’s Jan Dizard

Humans & Hunting with Amherst College’s Jan Dizard

November 21, 2019

"Fall means more to Jan Dizard than a return to teaching. For Dizard, the Charles Hamilton Houston Professor in American Culture, autumn also signifies another hunting season. It means weekends spent in the woods of New England and beyond, accompanied by his bird dog, Dee, stalking feathered prey. Jan is an expert on hunting trends and the author of several books and articles about hunting, guns, and attitudes toward nature and the outdoors."

We'll gain Jan's perception on how hunting has changed, how it is perceived today, and whether it should be important to both individuals & conservation going forward.

Jan Dizard is a Charles Hamilton Houston Professor of American Culture at Amherst College. He has taught sociology, American Studies, and, most recently, environmental studies, since joining Amherst faculty in 1969. He was born in Duluth, Minnesota and received his AB from the University of Minnesota, Duluth, in sociology in 1962. Jan also received his MA (1964) and PhD (1967) from the University of Chicago in sociology. Before joining the Amherst faculty, he taught at the University of California, Berkeley from 1965 to 1969. He has written several books and book chapters and articles on the modern family, but for the past twenty-five years his writing has focused on conflicting ideas about nature and our relationship to the natural world.

Kids In The Woods

Kids In The Woods

November 18, 2019
As a kid, did you have a place in the woods where you played? Away from adults where you built forts, climbed trees, got lost or burned stuff down? I know I did & wouldn't take it back for anything. Apparently, most kids today aren't experiencing "the woods" as their parents did. Supposedly, kids spend half the time as their parents did, or four hours/week. John & I will discuss how we spent our time outside growing up, the benefits and costs of outdoor play and how it might be impacting our perception of forestry today.
Bowhunting Black Bears with Joel Riotto

Bowhunting Black Bears with Joel Riotto

November 18, 2019

Some hunters go out for deer, and come back with a bear, but few study black bears and how to hunt them deliberately like Catskill Forest Association member--Joel Riotto. In addition to being a true and blue black bear hunter, Joel uses his re-curve bow in New Jersey, the Catskills and beyond to hunt these animals.

Joel Riotto resides in New Jersey and the Catskill Mountains of New York State. He is also an author of many archery and bow-hunting publications such as:

Bowhunter Magazine
Traditional Bowhunting Magazine
Archery World Magazine
Professional Bowhunting Society Magazine
Bear Hunting Magazine

Joel is also a Senior Member of the Pope & Young Club; Life Member #9 of the Professional Bowhunters Society; Life Member #95 of the NY Bowhunters; Life Member of the NJ Foundation of Sportsman’s Clubs; Founder, past-President, & member of the Traditional Archers of NJ; Past-President of the United Bowhunters of NJ; & Past-President & Life Member of the Bergen Bowmen Archery Club.

Portable Sawmills & Woodlot Management

Portable Sawmills & Woodlot Management

November 18, 2019

This week we'll be talking with Patrick Dolan, CFA's Education Forester, about our lumber resources here in the Catskill Mountains. We'll take a closer look at how a portable sawmill can tap into markets that are typically overlooked by commercial sawmill operations.

Managing Emerald Ash Borer with USDA’s Sawyer Gardner

Managing Emerald Ash Borer with USDA’s Sawyer Gardner

November 14, 2019

You might be aware of the destruction that this little emerald green insect is reeking across the northeast on ash trees recently, especially in the southern Catskill Mountains and Hudson Valley. Currently, the only treatment available are chemicals to treat individual ash trees with sentimental importance in the yard-scape. But, what about possibly treating entire stands or forests of ash trees?

The USDA Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is working on releasing some BIOCONTROLS to subdue the devastating ash impacts on a forest-wide basis. Sawyer Gardiner of the USDA APHIS will discuss how they are going about finding sites to release parasitoids of emerald ash borer in the Catskill Mountains. Hopefully, this is good news for ash going forward.

Hiking with Larry

Hiking with Larry

November 14, 2019
On From the Forest, we're always curious to hear from members of the Catskill Forest Association about their perception of the forest. Larry is a member & has been hiking quite a bit in recent years to get his mind away from the big city and into the mountains. We'll pick his brain about what brought him to the woods, his hiking style and more.
Apple Trees & Apples with Gary Mead

Apple Trees & Apples with Gary Mead

November 14, 2019

Tonight's show we will discuss APPLE TREES & APPLES. The apple tree is one of our most significant agricultural legacies. The apple is good for both humans & wildlife, has beautiful wood, and is a pretty tree to boot. We'll discuss everything from its growing site, to cultivation and care, to wood aspects, and of course the fruit.

Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a tree growing in our Catskill Mountains. Gary is the local owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill and Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.

Why Hunt in 2019

Why Hunt in 2019

November 14, 2019

Hunting participation is apparently half of what it was 50 years ago; Only 5% of Americans actually hunt presently. Even worse is that the "Age-Wall" of 65 is quickly approaching for the hunting demographic; 65 is apparently the "magic age" where most quit going afield.

Paradoxically, most Americans remain favorable towards the activity despite taking a sidelines position. The reasons for and against hunting are many & can be controversial. Still, hunting plays an important role in the forest setting. We'll discuss our reasons from two, relatively young guys who still engage in this activity.

The American Black Bear

The American Black Bear

November 14, 2019

On tonight's show, we'll discuss an overview of the American black bear, covering the historical range of this bear in North America, its decline and resurgence, biology, management, and some anecdotal stories to boot.

The black bear is a highly adaptable creature; It can be found in the boreal forest near Slide Mountain (highest peak of the Catskills) or down in the city of Kingston and everywhere in between. The black bear is certainly leaving its mark, whether on a tree, in a cornfield, as a foot-print in some remote swamp, or on your BBQ grill.

Caterpillars

Caterpillars

November 14, 2019

Lots of reports going around of caterpillars popping up. We'll discuss how to decipher some of the commonly found caterpillars found in the Catskills. We'll also talk about some caterpillar look-alikes and potential treatments if too much damage should occur.

Bark Peeling & Leather Tanning with Gary Mead

Bark Peeling & Leather Tanning with Gary Mead

November 14, 2019

On tonight's "From The Forest", we'll be discussing Bark Peeling and Leather Tanning in the Catskills. Spring through August historically marked the season for one of the Catskill Mountain's most famous industries: bark peeling.

Bark from the hemlock tree was peeled for making liquor in tanning leather. This week we're joined by Gary Mead, and we'll get Gary's take on this famous industry that paved the way for future industries and the forest we see today.

Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a particular tree growing in our Catskill Mountains or some other forest-related topic. Gary is the local owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill & Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.

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