From The Forest
Managing Deer & Deer Impacts with Cornell University’s Paul Curtis

Managing Deer & Deer Impacts with Cornell University’s Paul Curtis

January 14, 2021
Dr. Paul Curtis will be discussing the most influential (two) creatures in the forest--deer and humans. Paul will go into various topics mainly surrounding deer/deer impacts such as:

  1. The role of deer hunting in deer management.
  2. Evaluating deer impacts to forest regeneration and biodiversity.
  3. Efforts needed to reduce deer abundance to target goals.
  4. Impacts of deer in the Catskills and ADKs vs. other parts of the state.
  5. How does one measure deer management success?
  6. Relationship between deer abundance and deer impacts.
  7. Fencing to protect forest regeneration/slash walls.
With a PhD in Zoology from North Carolina State University, Dr Paul Curtis is now a Professor in the Department of Natural Resources at Cornell University. He has coordinated the Wildlife Damage Management Programme at Cornell for the past 30 years, which focuses on reducing conflicts, economic losses and human health and safety concerns caused by wildlife in both rural and suburban landscapes. His work includes wildlife fertility control and population management, community-based wildlife management issues and public education. Dr Curtis is also testing novel methods for reducing wildlife damage to agricultural crops and forest regeneration.
The River Otter

The River Otter

January 8, 2021

Tune in tonight for a great show on the river otter.

Firewood & Firewood Heating Appliances

Firewood & Firewood Heating Appliances

December 31, 2020
It's that time of year again--winter. Temperatures are plummeting into the single digits at night. In fact, my car thermometer reached -1 degrees coming over Highmount, Ulster County last week. We have already received more snowfall this winter than last year; Although that isn't saying too much. 
In any case, we'll be discussing one way to bare the winter by staying warm--heating with firewood. We'll start with the firewood itself: Benefits and costs, and how might you get the most out of it. We'll finish with examples of "heating appliances" or types of stoves and efficient ways in which to burn firewood.
Grading Trees from Stump to Lumber with Gary Mead

Grading Trees from Stump to Lumber with Gary Mead

December 26, 2020
On tonight's show, we'll the ins & outs of how trees are "valued" for timber, from the time they're on the stump to after they've been processed into lumber.
 
Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a tree growing in our Catskill Moutains. Gary is the former owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill & present owner of Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.
Health Risks of Lead in Venison–Gray Toxin or Red Herring?

Health Risks of Lead in Venison–Gray Toxin or Red Herring?

December 17, 2020
There's been quite a bit of discussion & debate concerning lead ammo in the hunting world. The long-time metal of choice is being most scrutinized by bird conservationists who claim it is negatively impacting bird individuals and populations. Now, lead is under fire surrounding the pursuit of the most prized game species of all--white-tailed deer. 
Recently, Certified Wildlife Biologist--Jim Heffelfinger--wrote an article in November's issue of Deer & Deer Hunting magazine--"Health Risks of Venison--Gray Toxin or Red Herring?" We'll ask Jim more about it on this Wednesday's show.
Jim Heffelfinger is a Certified Wildlife Biologist. Jim Heffelfinger is a Certified Wildlife Biologist who has worked as a biologist for the federal government, state wildlife agencies, universities, and in the private sector in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. Jim has authored or coauthored more than 200 magazine articles, dozens of scientific papers, and 20 book chapters in regional, national, and international publications.
The Flying Squirrel

The Flying Squirrel

December 10, 2020
I've seen coyotes, bear, turkey, deer, fox, and more; I never tire of seeing any of these guys, especially deer. However, one of the most memorable wildlife experiences to this day, is the flying squirrels I saw one day while my friend cut down a large sugar maple over a house. I got to watch about 8 or so of these little guys exit the tree in broad daylight and glide their way over to another maple tree about 50 yards away. They are the coolest little pilots I've ever seen.
On tonight's show, we'll discuss two flying squirrels that reside in New York State--Southern flying squirrel & Northern flying squirrel.
Maple & Oak Don’t Mix

Maple & Oak Don’t Mix

December 4, 2020
Some things seem to go together: Silver & gold, pen & pencil, peanut-butter & jelly, maple syrup & pancakes, steak & potatoes, Rip Van Winkle & the Catskills, wine & cheese. In the forest, there are things that seem to go to together too: Hemlock & brook trout, acorn tree & white-tailed deer, gray squirrel & hickory nut, shady forest & chanterelle, black bear in a black cherry tree. 
However, there are some things--even in the forest--that don't go together. Maple & Oak serve as one. Wherever the two are found, one seems to be doing better at the expense of the other. We'll cover why this is, and how it is--in my opinion--one of the more significant matters in today's forest.
Trees that Begin with “Black”

Trees that Begin with “Black”

December 4, 2020
On tonight's show, we'll discuss trees that begin with "black" with Gary Mead. Some that come to mind include black birch, black walnut, black locust, black cherry, black spruce, and more. As always, Gary brings along his experience in using the wood and its characteristics. 
 
Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a tree growing in our Catskill Moutains. Gary is the local owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill & Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.
 
All About Opossum

All About Opossum

November 20, 2020

On this week's show, we'll discuss North America's only marsupial--the opossum. I saw one of these little guys late at night a few days ago going after some of my food scraps. Those beady eyes and white face, with its "pacing gait" as it lumbered away, caught my attention. 

We'll talk about this unique animal's biology, reproduction, range, diet, behavior, habitat, ecological importance and more.

Venison From the Forest to Table

Venison From the Forest to Table

November 12, 2020

We're entering the heart of deer hunting season; From about Halloween to the middle of November, and that means (hopefully) that venison is on the way. On this week's show we'll discuss some of the work that begins once the deer is down, so that a dish of fine venison can be up on the table. 

Managing A Family Woodlot with Frank Winkler & Mike Porter

Managing A Family Woodlot with Frank Winkler & Mike Porter

November 12, 2020

Frank and Mike are both directors of the Catskill Forest Association. Each of them own woodlots in Andes, NY and coincidentally those properties are nearly across the street from one another. We will discuss with them the long term management strategies they are implementing, what their goals, troubles, and rewards have been and also discuss how harvesting trees fits into their long term goals.

Larch (Tamarack) with Gary Mead

Larch (Tamarack) with Gary Mead

November 12, 2020
On tonight's show, we'll discuss the larch or tamarack tree with Gary Mead; It's that exception-to-the-rule "evergreen" tree that loses its needles each year. As always, Gary brings along his experience in using the wood and its characteristics. 
 
Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a tree growing in our Catskill Moutains. Gary is the local owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill & Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.
The Importance of Family Forests in NY’s Economy

The Importance of Family Forests in NY’s Economy

October 22, 2020
State University of New York (SUNY) College of Environmental Science & Forestry's (ESF) Hugh Canham will be discussing the important role forest owners play in New York State. Hugh will cover important topics such as:

(1) Who owns the family forests & woods in NYS
(2) Why people own woods in NYS
(3) The diversity of forests in NYS
(4) Changes in ownership and uses of the forests over time
(5) What family forests contribute to the NYS economy & environment
(6) How woodland owners can get information on managing their woods

 

Dr. Canham is Professor Emeritus at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry where he taught and conducted research in forest and resource economics for over 30 years.  He has done extensive research in forest land ownership, regional economic impacts, forest taxation, and New York forestry.  His teachings embrace land use economics, the economics of non-market goods, and integrated forest management.  He has served as consultant to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Northern Forest Lands Council, Tug Hill Commission, United States Department of Agriculture, and New York City Catskill Watershed Agriculture Council.  He is the author of five articles in the Encyclopedia of New York, several entries in the Encyclopedia of American Forest and Conservation History and published a history of the 100-year-old Empire State Forest Products Association.  In addition, he has published in several refereed journals and has several monographs dealing with forest resources and the forest products industry both in New York and the United States.  Since his retirement he has focused on history and has made several presentations to the New York State Historical Society annual conferences on various subjects pertaining to New York State forestry and the unique relationship between the College of Environmental Science and Forestry and Syracuse University, which has been published in the book, SUNY at 60 Years.  He is the author of the 100 Year History of the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry.  He has just finished an updated look at the forest economy of New York entitled Just the Facts: The Past, Present, & Future of New York’s Forest & Forest Products, in conjunction with the Empire State Forest Products Association and New York Forest Owners Association.
 
Dr. Canham received all his degrees at the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry:
                        Bachelor of Science, General Forestry – 1960
                        Master of Science, Photogrammetry – 1962
                        Doctor of Philosophy, Forestry Economics – 1971
 
Dr. Canham is a member of the New York Forest Owners Association, a fellow in the Society of American Foresters, and an honorary member of the Empire State Forest Products Association.  He resides at Ballston Spa New York.
Forest Ranger Joseph Bink

Forest Ranger Joseph Bink

October 15, 2020
On this week's show we'll talk to New York State DEC Forest Ranger Joseph Bink. He covers Delaware County within "Region 4." 
Forest rangers are sworn police officers, who work within an assigned geographic area, and enforce provisions of the Environmental Conservation Law (ECL) in order to protect and enhance the State's lands and natural resources and the well-being of the public who use these resources. 

Forest Rangers organize and conduct search and rescue operations; educate the public in wilderness safety and natural resource care; and administer the State's wildland fire-management program, including wildfire suppression and prescribed fire activities.

Ryan’s Trip in the Woods (2020)

Ryan’s Trip in the Woods (2020)

October 15, 2020

Each year, FROM THE FOREST's Ryan Trapani, takes a few days to camp at some of his favorite places in the Catskills. We'll discuss Ryan's trip, from start to finish. We'll begin with preparation for such a camp-out, things to do while out in the woods, notable observations and wrapping things up. 

Tree Bark with Gary Mead

Tree Bark with Gary Mead

October 15, 2020

This week on From the Forest we will be talking to Gary Mead about tree bark. Bark can be utilized in many different ways, yet often times gets overlooked and discarded. We will ask Gary about his experiences using tree bark building his home, amongst other uses.

The Woodlanders with Costa Boutsikaris

The Woodlanders with Costa Boutsikaris

September 24, 2020

We'll speak to Film Director--Costa Boutsikaris--about his online film series about those that make their living, "from the forest." Costa is the Film Director of "The Woodlanders."

"WOODLANDERS IS AN ONLINE FILM SERIES THAT SEEKS TO DOCUMENT THE WORK OF PEOPLE WHO CARE FOR AND DEPEND ON FORESTS FOR THEIR LIVELIHOOD AND WELL-BEING THROUGHOUT THE WORLD." 

"EVEN AMONG TODAY'S PROGRESSIVE MOVEMENTS OF LOCAL ECONOMY AND FOOD SYSTEMS, THE VAST GLOBAL KNOWLEDGE OF FOREST LIVELIHOODS AND ECONOMIES ARE MOSTLY UNDERVALUED AND UNDOCUMENTED. FROM WOODCRAFT AND NUT TREE CULTURES OF ANCIENT EUROPE, TO MUSHROOM AND FOREST MEDICINES OF ASIA, THERE MANY FASCINATING WAYS OF CREATING SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIES FROM THE FORESTS WHILE MAINTAINING THEIR ECOLOGICAL HEALTH AND COMPLEXITY."

Costa is a native of the Hudson River Valley in New York. His studies in visual arts coupled with a deep fascination in permaculture and ecological design has led him to focus on sharing these insights through digital storytelling.
Forestry with Forester Laurie Raskin

Forestry with Forester Laurie Raskin

September 10, 2020
On this week's FROM THE FOREST radio show, we'll be interviewing DHW Forest Consulting, LLC's--Laurie Raskin. Laurie is a private Consulting Forester serving forest owners in the Hudson Valley/Catskill Region/Central NY. 

Laurie is a graduate from the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and earned a degree in Forest Resource Management. 

​She helps landowners achieve their goals, and strives to implement forest management that is ecologically sound, socially acceptable, and financially feasible.

Laurie is a member of the NY Society of American Foresters, a member of the NYS DEC Cooperating Foresters program and the NYS Watershed Agricultural Council. 

Tent Caterpillar Pests & Look Alikes

Tent Caterpillar Pests & Look Alikes

September 3, 2020

Maybe you've seen a couple of "tents" in your apple or hickory trees and are wondering what it is. Or perhaps you've noticed one of your trees is missing its leaves. On this week's show we'll cover "tent caterpillars", including their biology and impacts, as well as some management too.

Black Walnut with Gary Mead

Black Walnut with Gary Mead

August 27, 2020
On tonight's show, we'll discuss the black walnut tree with Gary Mead. We'll discuss its importance to both humans, wildlife, where they grow and can be found. As always, Gary brings along his experience in using the wood and its characteristics. 
 
Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a tree growing in our Catskill Moutains. Gary is the local owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill & Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.
Permaculture with Andrew Faust

Permaculture with Andrew Faust

August 20, 2020

On this week's show, we'll talk to Andrew Faust, Founder & Director of the Center for BioRegional Living in Ellenville, Ulster County, NY. Andrew is a teacher and practitioner of Permaculture. What's Permaculture? One definition is that it's "the development of agricultural ecosystems intended to be sustainable and self-sufficient." We'll see how Andrew defines it.

Andrew is considered one of the premier Permaculture teachers and designers in North America with over two decades of experience in the field. His passionate and mind expanding talks and curriculum have motivated teachers, students since his decade long career as a H.S. teacher at Upattina's, a open community free school in Glenmoore, PA. View Faust's TED X lecture. 

Andrew created his own Permaculture Ph'd project, in 1999, a fully off grid, Straw Bale educational center in Pocahontas County W.V. He moved to Brooklyn in 2007 and has been applying his knowledge to the urban landscape.Faust has been inspiring film makers with the message of Permaculture culminating in the film: Inhabit,  and a life changing Permaculture Design Certification course, with over 500 graduates. Faust received a dual diploma in Design and Education from Permaculture Institute of North America in 2016. Andrew and Adriana Magaña with their daughter Juniper run the Center for Bioregional Living in Ellenville, NY., a hands-on educational campus for students and clients.

Andrew Faust, a visionary permaculture and bioregional educator taps into the rich synergy between permaculture and biodynamic agriculture which he has been studying with a focus on orchards since he completed his permaculture design training in 1996.  

Playing in the Woods with Mike Porter

Playing in the Woods with Mike Porter

August 13, 2020

 

Mike Porter is the President of the Catskill Forest Association. He is a lifelong resident of the Catskill Mountains and still loves to play in his woods. We are going to speak with Mike about his experiences growing up, buying forested land to play in, and what he has done throughout his lifetime to keep playing in the forests of the Catskill Mountains.

 

Meet the Timber Rattler

Meet the Timber Rattler

July 29, 2020

New York State has 3 poisonous snakes. One is the copperhead and the other two are rattlesnakes. The massasauga or "swamp rattler" is extremely rare; It is found in only 2 locations of central/western NYS. The timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) is larger and can be found in some areas of the Catskill Mountains and Shawangunk Ridge. The timber rattler is considered "threatened" in NYS, but its presence can still be found, like this one I almost stepped on last Sunday.

We'll describe this secretive snake, its biology, life history, feeding habits, and our thoughts on why its habitat seems to be fading away. We'll also cover how this interesting snake was also revered by America's Founding Fathers too and competed for the nation's symbol alongside the bald eagle.  

Paulownia with Gary Mead

Paulownia with Gary Mead

July 23, 2020
Paulownia with Gary Mead. This Week on From the Forest we will be speaking with Gary Mead about the paulownia tree (A.K.A. princess tree or empress tree). This tree is a non-native of the Catskill Mountains and rarely found. It has a bad wrap in some states where it has been deemed "invasive" and banned such as in Connecticut. However, according to the USDA, this tree is rarely invasive in most of the northeast, and really only can survive in extremely disturbed areas. Paulownia has been around since the mid 19th Century and it flowers and form are mesmerizing. The wood too is highly useful from this extremely fast-growing tree. Some like the American Paulownia Association highly revere this tree which used to be called "the magic tree" in the 1970s due to its multi-purpose nature. 
Every third Wednesday we have local sawmill owner and wood artist, Gary Mead, to discuss a different Catskill Tree species. Gary is the owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill and Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.  
Woodland Wildlife Habitat & More

Woodland Wildlife Habitat & More

July 16, 2020

On tonight's show we'll dicsuss mostly woodland wildlife habitat management or things that can be done in the forest to improve quality habitat for wildlife. We'll also discuss some things you can do in the "dooryard" or near the house to improve habitat as well.

Four Favorite Trees

Four Favorite Trees

July 9, 2020

On tonight's show we'll talk about our Four Favorite Trees; There might be an Honorable Mention. It's a difficult list to come up with, since we like so many trees of course. But, we had to narrow it down. What makes a tree a "favorite?" Maybe it's a memory of that tree as kid? Maybe it reminds you of something special? Maybe it has something edible about it. Or its shape, flowers, leaves, fall foliage, or bark stand out? Maybe you like the wildlife that it attracts, or the historical significance it brings? We'll see.

Catskill Heritage Brook Trout Study with SUNY Albany’s Dr. Spencer Bruce

Catskill Heritage Brook Trout Study with SUNY Albany’s Dr. Spencer Bruce

July 2, 2020
The New York State fish is the brook trout; Also known as "speckled trout" or "brookie." These little guys have attracted the praise from many a fisherman due to both their beautiful color-scheme and mountain-stream haunts. 

The Ashokan-Pepacton Watershed Chapter of Trout Unlimited recently retained the services of SUNY Albany Researcher & Teacher--Dr. Spencer Bruce--to study the genes of brook trout in one particular stream near West Shokan, Ulster County to find out just how "native" these brookies are. We'll find out. 

 
Dr. Spencer Bruce is currently working as a postdoctoral researcher at the University at Albany where he employs genetic and genomic approaches to elucidate the ways in which landscape ecology and habitat heterogeneity shape population structure. His current research ranges from aquatic population genetics to wildlife disease genomics, with an emphasis on applicability in the context of biodiversity preservation and wildlife conservation. 

Dr. Bruce holds a Doctorate in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, as well as a Master of Science in Biodiversity, Conservation & Policy. He has over six years of experience teaching at the college level and has worked as an adjunct faculty member at multiple institutions. His previous and current research program emphasizes the participation and mentoring of a diverse array of students at both the undergraduate and graduate level.

Understanding A Forest Through Trees

Understanding A Forest Through Trees

June 25, 2020

We have discussed "Forest Forensics" or "Reading the Forested Landscape" with Author & Professor--Tom Wessels before. In that episode, Tom extensively goes into observations about trees, terrain-factors, stone walls, and more to gain insight about the history of a forest in New England. In this episode, we'll stick to mainly the trees. We'll cover one example-forest in Ulster County to illustrate how you might tell which trees grew first, second, and third and what might have caused them to grow in the first place and afterwards.

Mountain Top Arboretum with Marc Wolf

Mountain Top Arboretum with Marc Wolf

June 11, 2020

Mountain Top Arboretum is a public garden in the Catskill Mountains dedicated to displaying and managing native plant communities of the northeastern US, in addition to curating its collection of cold-hardy native and exotic trees. Its mountain top elevation of 2,400 feet at the top of the New York City Watershed creates a unique environment for education, research and pure enjoyment of the spectacular and historic Catskills landscape. The Arboretum trails and boardwalks connect 178 acres of plant collections, natural meadows, wetlands, forest and Devonian bedrock—a natural sanctuary for visitors interested in horticulture, birding, geology, local craftsmanship, hiking and snowshoeing!

Marc Wolf is Mountain Top Arboretum's Executive Director.

Turkeys & Turkey Hunting

Turkeys & Turkey Hunting

June 4, 2020

May 1st through May 31st is hunting season for some in New York State; It marks the spring turkey season. Unlike in the fall, spring turkey hunting includes a lot of "action" since turkeys can be "called" in. Responsive gobblers in an otherwise quiet forest is a memory not easily forgotten. We'll discuss some basic biology of the eastern wild turkey as well as hunting techniques, stories, and more.

White Oak with Gary Mead

White Oak with Gary Mead

May 28, 2020

WIOX From the Forest – Catskill Trees with Gary Mead – white oak and more. This Week on From the Forest we will be speaking with Gary Mead about white oak trees, their uses, where they grow, as well as what wood products they provide. 
 
Every third Wednesday we have local sawmill owner and wood artist, Gary Mead, to discuss a different Catskill Tree species. Gary is the owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill and Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.  

SuperSplitter–The Original Kinetic Log Splitter with Owner Paul McCann

SuperSplitter–The Original Kinetic Log Splitter with Owner Paul McCann

May 21, 2020

Ever hear about a kinetic wood-splitter before? One of our members told me years ago that if he were beginning his "career" again in firewood, he would buy a kinetic wood-splitter over the more well-known hydraulic splitter. More recently I was reading an article about these wood-splitters in "Independent Sawmill & Woodlot Management" magazine and I came across SuperSplitter, Inc. who makes them. After looking into them a little bit, they do seem promising.

Paul McCann is the owner of SuperSplitter, Inc. and holds the patent on the original kinetic wood-splitter since 1978. Paul, his son Connor, and wife Maureen run SuperSplitter, Inc. in West Bridgewater, MA near Boston. We'll ask Paul about his patented design and if it might fit your firewood needs too.

Paul McCann is the Owner and President of SuperSplitter, Inc. From the ground up, the SuperSplit kinetic splitter is made in the USA. And while they have added many employees over the years in order to keep up with demand, they are still a family owned and operated business. For decades they have made the SuperSplit kinetic splitter, and know it inside and out (and, yes, Paul still makes them with his own hands).

Wild Bees, Trees, & More with Cornell University’s Kass Urban-Mead

Wild Bees, Trees, & More with Cornell University’s Kass Urban-Mead

May 14, 2020
You might be familiar with the beautifully industrious honey bee brought to North America in the 1600s. However, according to Cornell University's--Kass Urban-Mead--New York State is home to over 400 species of native wild bees. Kass has been busy climbing up into trees and discovering the increasingly important role they play in pollinating plants across the landscape. Who knew there were so many bees?
Kass is a PhD Candidate in the Danforth & McArt labs in the Cornell University Entomology Department. She is interested in sustainable land management for insect conservation, particularly in agriculture & forestry. Kass's dissertation explores the landscape, nutritional, network, and community ecology of wild bees in agro-ecosystems. Kass climbs into temperate tree canopies to research how forest resources are used by orchard-pollinating wild bee species. She has found that the details of the lives of bees open an endlessly complex avenue to explore humans’ relationship with the land.
What’s Up with Bats with Batman Tim Carter

What’s Up with Bats with Batman Tim Carter

May 14, 2020
In the last decade or so, bats have taken quite a hit. For instance, it's estimated that the Indiana bat's population has been reduced by 95%. The disease known as "white nose syndrome" seems to be the main culprit. Ball State University's--Tim Carter--has been extensively researching the bats, the disease, and management practices in hope of brining back the bats. We'll find out from Tim; He is "Batman."

Dr. Tim Carter is currently the Chair of Environment, Geology, and Natural Resources Department and Director of Field Stations and Environmental Education Center and Professor of Biology at Ball State University. He teaches courses in wildlife biology and mammology and serves as curator for the Ball State University Mammalogy Collection.

Tim's research focuses on non-game and endangered species and how land management affects these animal populations. In particular, he has studied the federally endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) with a focus on identifying and delineating critical summer habitats as well as examining winter hibernation habitats. Recently, he has worked more closely with Urban Ecology, studying the ecology and management of over abundant species such as deer and geese.

Outdoor Education with CFA Board President Mike Porter

Outdoor Education with CFA Board President Mike Porter

May 7, 2020

Mike is a retired Earth Science teacher and his day-to-day activities are mostly "from the forest" where he draws inspiration and support from, especially during these difficult times. Since the pandemic began and people have been forced to stay at home, Mike has been writing a letter each week to members on how they might learn and enjoy the trees/forest near and around them with their family. In his letters, Mike has made recommendations on what to look for in the woods, such as making collections of plants for the kids, identifying birds, trees, and wildflowers or where to take hike. I know I've learned a lot from Mike and we hope you can too.

Mike is a retired teacher from Margaretville Central School. He taught Earth Science, Environmental Science, Science Research in the High School, Driver Education and several elementary and junior high courses over his 33-year career. In 1988 he was selected as the New York State Conservation Teacher of the Year by the New York State Board of Soil and Water Districts. A life-long resident of Delaware County, Mike is an avid birder and has studied the changes in the avian community over the years.

As a small woodlot landowner, he has learned to manage his property to better enhance wildlife, timber quality and maple syrup production. Mike has been an active volunteer Fireman for nearly 45 years and was an Executive officer for most of that time. He was a member of the Town of Middletown Zoning Board of Appeals and, later, a Planning Board member and Chair. Besides birding, Mike gardens, makes Maple syrup, cuts his own firewood and does woodworking. Currently, he is harvesting trees from his property and preparing his own lumber via a bandsaw mill on the property.

What is Nature to You with Gary Mead

What is Nature to You with Gary Mead

April 23, 2020

Every third Wednesday we speak with local wood artist Gary Mead. Gary is the owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill and Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY. This month we will talk about what being in "Nature" means to each of us and how we get out in the woods. For some, the vast wilderness can be the patch of woods behind our homes, for others it means a weekend trip backpacking in 3-5 miles off the road.

Finding Spirit in the Forest with Catskill Mountain Woodsman_Hoppy Quick

Finding Spirit in the Forest with Catskill Mountain Woodsman_Hoppy Quick

April 18, 2020

The forest and mountains are old friends to local Catskill Mountain Woodsman--Hoppy Quick. Although, during these vulnerable times when many are practicing "social distancing", Hoppy finds the forest a peaceful home to strengthen his spirit and quiet any fears. Hoppy has been on the show numerous times before including topics describing his famous and realistic chainsaw carvings, "defining rural", "stories from the forest", and "Hoppy Goes to NYC." On Wednesday's show we'll ask Hoppy about how he defines "spirit" that's "from the forest."

Hoppy Quick was born & raised in West Shokan, Ulster County. He still resides in the Town of Olive where he continues to carve his famously realistic--and "spirit-animal"--the black bear. Hoppy has recently gained quite a following on his daily Facebook Live Stream where he can be seen fishing near the Ashokan Reservoir, or up some mountain or other engaging people both locally and internationally about his relation to others, the environment and of course his spiritual beliefs.

Floodplains & Forests with Resource Educator–Brent Gotsch

Floodplains & Forests with Resource Educator–Brent Gotsch

April 9, 2020

On this week's show we'll discuss the intersection of streams, floodplains, and forests with Resource Educator--Brent Gotsch--from the Ashokan Watershed Stream Management Program.

Brent Gotsch is a Resource Educator with the Ashokan Watershed Stream Management Program (AWSMP) where he specializes in flood hazard mitigation trainings. He has been a Certified Floodplain Manager (CFM) since 2012. Most of his programming revolves around helping communities become more resilient to flooding and other natural disasters and to stay in compliance with the National Flood Insurance Program. He also helps to organize and implement community programming around stream management and watershed science topics.

In his spare time he enjoys being outdoors, especially on his family’s Christmas Tree farm located in-between the Rondout and Neversink Reservoirs in Sullivan County, NY. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree and a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

2020 Backyard Sugaring Report

2020 Backyard Sugaring Report

April 2, 2020

That's right. Those are maple buckets no longer hanging out on the tree, but stacked and stored for next season, which means this year is already over for many maple producers. On this Wednesday's show, we'll summarize this early maple season: How it began; How it went; & How much we made. We'll also cover some backyard sugaring pitfalls and tips we've learned along the way since 2007.

Catskill Trees with Gary Mead_Sycamore & Photosynthesis

Catskill Trees with Gary Mead_Sycamore & Photosynthesis

April 2, 2020

WIOX From the Forest – Catskill Trees with Gary Mead – Sycamore and More. This Week on From the Forest we will be speaking with Gary Mead about Sycamore trees, their uses, where they grow, as well as what wood products they provide. Gary also wants to touch on Photosynthesis and sycamore syrup and more!

Every third Wednesday we have local sawmill owner and wood artist, Gary Mead, to discuss a different Catskill Tree species. Gary is the owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill and Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.

Role of Forest Products & Biomass-Based Energy on Climate Change with Robert Malmsheimer

Role of Forest Products & Biomass-Based Energy on Climate Change with Robert Malmsheimer

March 19, 2020
SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry's Robert Malmsheimer will discuss (1) Climate change and why it's occurring; (2) The role of forest products in addressing climate change; (3) The role of forest biomass energy in addressing climate change; & (4) Other important aspects  surrounding the significance of  markets, feedstock for the bioeconomy, and bioenergy carbon capture and storage.
Robert Malmsheimer is a Professor of Forest Policy & Law at the State University of New York's College of Environmental Science & Forestry (SUNY ESF) in Syracuse. He is the Associate Chair of the Department of Forest & Natural Resources Management. He has earned his Ph.D. from SUNY ESF in 1999 and his J.D. from the Albany Law School, Union University in 1989. His Areas of Study include US Forest & Natural Resources Policy & Law; & Biomass Carbon Accounting Policies & their Affect on US Natural Resources. Courses taught include Natural Resources Policy; Business Law; Environmental Law & Policy; & Natural Resources Law.
Backyard Sugaring with CFA Board President Mike Porter

Backyard Sugaring with CFA Board President Mike Porter

March 19, 2020

This weeks show we will be talking to Catskill Forest Association’s Board President Mike Porter about Maple Sugaring at the smallest scales: In the Backyard. Mike and John each boil maple sap on the non-commercial scales. We will keep the discussion geared towards the equipment we use, what we look for differently than a commercial operation, when we tap, and much more.

Tree Planting

Tree Planting

March 19, 2020

There is a saying that "the best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago."  I would add that the best time to plant a tree is not only about timing, but matching the "correct" tree to the right site. For instance, my apple trees are doing alright, but heavy clay is a struggle to drain. On this week's show we'll discuss some basics surrounding TREE PLANTING. I just got back from a training at Rutgers University and will share some new information arborists are using in planting trees.

Ancient Fossil Forests of the Catskills with Dr. Chris Berry

Ancient Fossil Forests of the Catskills with Dr. Chris Berry

February 29, 2020

Scientists from Binghamton University, Cardiff University, and New York State Museum have reported the discovery of the floor of the world's oldest forest, right here in the Catskill Mountains of Gilboa, Schoharie County. "It was like discovering the botanical equivalent of dinosaur footprints," said Dr. William Stein, associate professor of biological sciences at Binghamton University. "But the most exciting part was finding out just how many different types of footprints there were. The newly uncovered area was preserved in such a way that we were literally able to walk among the trees, noting what kind they were, where they had stood and how big they had grown." Scientists are now piecing together a view of this ancient site, dating back about 385 million years ago, which could shed new light on the role of modern-day forests and their impact on climate change.

We'll be interviewing Cardiff University's Dr. Chris Berry about his research on this ancient forest in Gilboa. What kind of plants did they find? What was this ancient forest floor like? What do these ancient plants tell us about the climate back then?

Dr. Chris Berry is a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Earth and Ocean Sciences - School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University (1998-present). Dr. Berry was a Research Fellow at the University of Wales, Cardiff University (1996-1998); Royal Society Exchange Fellowship, Liège University (1994-1995); and earned his PhD - Devonian Plant Fossils from Venezuela, Geology Department, Cardiff University (1993) and BA Earth Sciences – Cambridge University (1989).

Dr. Berry specializes in understanding the early radiation of large plants and birth of forest ecosystems in the Devonian Period (380 million years ago).

Wintergreen Fern with SUNY Delhi’s Jack Tessier

Wintergreen Fern with SUNY Delhi’s Jack Tessier

February 29, 2020
SUNY Delhi's Jack Tessier will discuss wintergreen ferns. Ever see ferns buried in the snow and still retaining their green pigment? Those are wintergreen ferns; one of the only plants that can photosynthesize when temperatures break above freezing during the winter or early spring. 
Jack Tessier is a professor at SUNY Delhi within the Liberal Arts & Sciences Department. His areas of expertise are ecology, environment, teaching and learning. His research is in ecology, ecophysiology, and the natural history of plants, especially forest understory plants.
Apple Tree Pruning & Grafting

Apple Tree Pruning & Grafting

February 6, 2020

January through March is the time to prune apple trees. During the same time, we also gather scionwood or cuttings to be used in April/May for grafting onto apple trees. For this week's show, we'll talk about the basic apple tree pruning principles and how you might plan for the upcoming grafting season as well.

New Hampshire Fish & Game with Officer Nick Masucci

New Hampshire Fish & Game with Officer Nick Masucci

January 30, 2020

Nick Masucci, a former Forest Program Technician of the Catskill Forest Association, is now an officer with the New Hampshire Fish & Game Department. We'll ask Nick about his day-to-day duties up there in New England dealing with both wildlife and people. We also want to know about one particular animal that is legally hunted there in New Hampshire -- moose.

Oak Trees with Gary Mead

Oak Trees with Gary Mead

January 23, 2020

 

On tonight's show, we'll discuss Oak Trees with Gary Mead, both red and white. We haven't discussed their key differences and unique qualities of the two since 2013! Oak trees are divided into two groups -- red and white -- and we'll discuss the importance to both humans, wildlife, where they grow and can be found. As always, Gary brings along his experience in using the wood and its characteristics. 

 

Every third Wednesday of the month we invite Gary Mead on the show to talk about a tree growing in our Catskill Moutains. Gary is the local owner of Fruitful Furnishings Sawmill & Gary Mead Gallery in Margaretville, NY.
Herbicides & Forestry with PSU’s David Jackson

Herbicides & Forestry with PSU’s David Jackson

January 16, 2020
Pennsylvania State University's--David Jackson--will discuss how to control competing or interfering vegetation in the forest. Many of you are aware of how your goals can be thwarted from "weeds" in the woods. Examples include both native and non-native plants: New York fern, American beech, striped maple, Japanese stilt-grass, Japanese barberry, etc. 

David focuses on "Integrated Vegetation Management" that includes cultural controls, mechanical controls, biological controls, and chemical controls. Most of our talk will focus on chemical controls since herbicides--according to David--can be highly effective if used properly. 

Dave is currently a Forest Resources Educator for Penn State Extension covering a multi-county area throughout central Pennsylvania. Dave has been with Penn State in his current position since January 2002. His primary responsibilities are to deliver educational programs to private forest landowners, youth, and natural resource professionals.

Dave earned his Bachelor of Science degree from The College of Environmental Science and Forestry at Syracuse, New York in 1988 in the fields of forest resource management and forest biology. He completed a Master of Forest Resources degree at The Pennsylvania State University in August 2007. Dave’s master’s work focused on creating educational material on the use of herbicides in managing forest vegetation.
Prior to coming to Penn State Dave worked at various seasonal and temporary positions with the U.S Forest Service in Montana, Vermont, and Pennsylvania as well as with Boise Cascade Corporation in southwestern Oregon. Dave also spent a year working for the University of Kentucky on their teaching and research forest before accepting a position with the Virginia Department of Forestry in 1992 where he spent 8 years as a service forester. Dave left Virginia in 2000 to take a position with Forecon, Inc. Consulting Foresters as a field forester managing lands in the eastern Catskill Mountains of New York State.

Dave is currently a member of the Society of American Foresters, the Association of Natural Resource Extension Professionals, and the Pennsylvania Forestry Association. Dave currently serves as Inspector Training Coordinator for the Pennsylvania Tree Farm Committee. He is a board member for the Pennsylvania Forestry Association and serves on the Rothrock Chapter of the Society of American Foresters.

Logging with the Krickhahns

Logging with the Krickhahns

January 9, 2020

The practice of Logging is how wood is cut and brought out of the woods to meet society's demand for wood products; Yep, I just said "wood" three times. The Krickhahns are one such family that makes this happen. Paul Krickhahn, Jr. & his son Paul A. Krickhahn are full-time Catskill Mountain Loggers. Loggers are more than just cutters, they are what makes forest management possible, since most management relies upon cutting in order to manipulate sunlight and species composition. As one older Forester told me many years ago, "We need them more than they need us." I believe he's still right about that.

The Krickhahns own PGK Logging, Inc. and their home-base is in Roxbury, Delaware County. 

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